California has a swine flue outbreak! How do I protect my birds

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Crystalchic, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. Crystalchic

    Crystalchic Gone for a bit

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    Does swine flue affect chickens. It is on breaking news that California has a swine flue outbreak. What can I do to protect my flock
     
  2. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    google it.........
     
  3. Crystalchic

    Crystalchic Gone for a bit

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    I was hoping for a quick answer. I am now looking on the internet
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    You don't keep pigs and chickens, do you?

    As I understand it, the Mexican, Canadian and American authorities are acting fast to identify those who have contracted the flu and to limit the exposure of others. At this time, normal hygiene precautions should be enough. Just avoid contact with anyone from the flu zone and change clothing and shower if you think you may have been exposed. No visitors in coops.

    http://www.cdc.gov/flu/swine/investigation.htm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8016909.stm
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2009
  5. australorpchick

    australorpchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read that this was also going on in Texas. It's a mixture of avian, swine and human flu viruses, making a whole new nasty bug. I would make sure nothing with the sniffles goes anywhere near your birds (or yourself).
     
  6. Crystalchic

    Crystalchic Gone for a bit

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    the issue that I have is that i just brought in a pair of silkies to my flock from utah, and only the rooster is standing in the corner since i brought him home. he is eating and drinking, then goes back to the corner. He is in the coop with my hens, he is the only rooster. everyone is fine. i always quarantine new birds, why didnt i do it this time is beyond me. the rooster is strong when i try to pick him up.
     
  7. Crystalchic

    Crystalchic Gone for a bit

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    Oh! no i do not have pigs, but my neighbor three acres away does
     
  8. Im4Eggcellence

    Im4Eggcellence Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well folks, as of this morning this situation in Mexico is looking more and more like the dreaded "perfect storm" that scientist have been concerned about for years - the combination of swine, avian, and human flu genetic sequences in a new virus able to cross-infect all of the above plus apparently cats as well from what I understand. And latest word from the CDC is that it apparently is too late for local containment.

    Since we all here have a vested interest in both our familys and our flocks, it might not be a bad idea for us all to get up to speed quickly on this issue to protect both.

    The Governments site as pretty good general information here:
    http://www.pandemicflu.gov/

    And good avian information from them can be found here:
    http://www.pandemicflu.gov/issues/index.html

    I think we all need to get pro-active here review and practice good bio-security. The last thing we want is for small back yard flocks to get labeled a public health threat. Let's keep our fingers crossed - this situation is evolving rapidly, and it's not looking too pretty.
     
  9. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    The upside is that this is an H1N1 virus and the one that the scientists worry most about is H5N1, so it's a different strain. I would still be cautious and not bring any new birds (or pigs) home for awhile, but don't stress too much.
     
  10. Im4Eggcellence

    Im4Eggcellence Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I don't want to be an alarmist here, but I watched a documentary on this a while back. My understanding is that scientist were most concerned with H5N1 because that's the strain they felt was most susceptible to a genetic mutation allowing it to bridge the animal/human infection gap. It now appears this new strain may have beat H5N1 to that.
     

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