calling all showgirl and silkie breeders couple ???

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ninny, Nov 14, 2008.

  1. ninny

    ninny Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    IL side of the QCA
    Just a couple quick ones i promise [​IMG]


    1. Do you cross a bearded or non bearded silkie with a turken to get a showgirl?

    2. Could you get a silkie or showgirl with a different color crest or tail such as the polish and japenese have?

    3. What is the best color to have as a starting flock of silkies for playing with new colors?

    4. How many generations would it take to cement the naked neck gene and to how many to cement the silkiness back?


    ok thats it!
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2008
  2. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    naked neck is dominant, silkie is recessive.
     
  3. ninny

    ninny Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    IL side of the QCA
    So how many gens to get the silkiness back?
     
  4. Hi!
    4. How many generations would it take to cement the naked neck gene and to how many to cement the silkiness back?

    First generation, all chicks from the cross will be regular feathered.
    Half should be naked neck, half should be feather neck.

    Second generation, breed a naked neck from the first cross back to a Silkie.
    Half the chicks will be naked neck, half will be feather neck. A percentage will be silkie feathered.

    Third generation, breed a silkie feathered naked neck from the 2nd generation back to a Silkie.
    All the chicks will be silkie feathered. Half the chicks will be naked neck, half will be feather neck.

    Once you get to that point...

    Silkie feather x silkie feather should always give you silkie feather.
    Naked neck x feather neck will give you half NN and half feather neck.

    Good luck!
    [​IMG]
    Lisa​
     
  5. LilPeeps

    LilPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    SE Mass
    It doesn't matter whether you use bearded or nb birds in developing showgirls. They come in both bearded and nb.

    I guess if you were to breed them with birds with crest or tail colors varying from that of the body you could develop silkies and showgirls with these traits.

    The color you should begin with depends on the variety you want to work on, although I believe that black is most commonly used.

    You can get silkie feathered, NN birds in the f2 generation of breeding, although it will take many more (10+) before you will get some with very nice silkie type.

    If you have birds that are heterozygous for the NN gene and cross this with a silkie, you will get 50% het NN, 50% feathered neck. If you have birds that are homozygous for NN and cross this birds with feathered necks, you will get 100% het NN. Crossing het NN x het NN = 25% homo NN, 50% het NN, 25% feathered neck. Homo NN x het NN = 50% homo NN, 50% het NN.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2008
  6. ninny

    ninny Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    IL side of the QCA
    Could i use a hatchery turken or do i need to get a show bird?

    If i wanted to breed say milli fleur could i do showgirls and silkie at the same time?

    how would i do that if turkens dont come in the color i would like to use?

    If i used all the chicks from the first cross and crossed them back with silkies would i just keep crossing the same way as was explained?

    And how do you cement the color?

    if im being a pest im sorry. Im very exicted to try a get a start in the spring!

    Does anyone have a picture of a bearded showgirl i think ive only seen a nb.

    THANK YOU!!!!! YOU GUYS ARE THE BEST!!!!
     
  7. ninny

    ninny Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    IL side of the QCA
    bumping myself up
     
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    You can use any naked necked bird. It's a dominant gene and is what "makes" a showgirl different from a silkie.

    You could do that, and it is fun to learn the genetics first hand.. however if your end goal is to have nice looking birds, then it is very important to have nice, typy silkies from show stock. These are the birds that will help achieve the good type plus good quality if the "silking" plus hopefully have the dark skin.. Dark skins is somewhat of a challenge because the naked neck REALLY shows if the bird does not have the good genes for a deep dark skin.. not much of a problem on fully feathered silkies! Silkies are such complex breed with many not-so-obvious genes and for this reason it takes quite a lot of generations.. so if a wait of 5 or more years is not your thing, it really is better to start with a showgirl.. you only need one showgirl at the very least if you have or are going to get a bunch of silkies. I often see showgirls or eggs for sale here and there.

    But yes, that is the idea- keep breeding back the crosses to a pure silkie to get what you want.

    You may have seen bearded showgirls.. in most birds, the naked neck gene 'removes' the beard, leaving only the sideburns. If you see a bird with what looks like sideburns sticking out of their cheeks, it probably is a bearded. (I think it looks very cute heh)

    Color is a separate issue with separate answers.. however the color genetics goes the same as in any other breeds.

    Not sure if you meant by the mille fluer question..
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2008
  9. ninny

    ninny Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    IL side of the QCA
    Thanks!


    i would love to breed millie fleur silkies and showgirls but dont know how to get the color and how to make it stick/
     
  10. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Sun City, California
    Ah! Unfortunately to the loose feathering, a lot of patterns don't show up very well on silkies. For example, look at partridge silkies vs partridges on other breeds.. you just can't see the same patterns on silkies, except for a very general pattern, the little delicate detailing is completely obscured on the silkie 'fur'.

    Mottled tips on a silkie might be too frayed apart to make a distinct mottle spot, the neat white spot depends on the feather holding together well to show the pattern.. but then who knows how exactly they look unless someone makes one..

    It would be much easier to keep the mille fleur or mottle(that would be much easier than mille fluer) line separate from the showgirl line. The more genes you want in the same bird, the much harder it becomes to reach. Mille fleur requires several genes to be in the same bird plus being pure for the mottle gene to have the mille fleur pattern.
     

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