can a hen go broody more than once?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickenlover4444, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. chickenlover4444

    chickenlover4444 Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Jul 1, 2011
    hi, I was wondering that if a hen is broody and then it's brood is brocken can it become broody again?
     
  2. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

    7,096
    12
    261
    Sep 10, 2008
    Lakeland, FL
    Yes, some hens are very insistent.
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,494
    2,150
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Yes, usually starts with laying cycle.
     
  4. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2009
    California
    Oh yes! Some hens only pretend to be not broody! They can seem broody, then not be too. A broody can stop being broody and go right back to it a week later! I have an 3 year old hen I can count on to go broody at least 2 times a year, something she has done since she started laying at 6 months old! Shes a great mom and very dependable.

    Some hens never go broody, others do it all their lives (on and off, of course). Sometimes the best thing is to just let a hen get on with it and let her hatch a few babies (or give her a few day-olds from a feed store to raise) so she can get back to laying sooner, or just keep trying to break her. Your choice!

    Godd luck!
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,494
    2,150
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Typical broodiness pattern in my games (which in some ways approximate wild chickens).

    Step 1. Maturity
    Step 2. Good condition
    Step 3. Eggs layed
    Step 4. Enough eggs / lumps contacting hens breast to stimulate broodiness, varies greatly between hens
    Step 5. Hatch, hen bonds with chicks which maintains broodiness even when nest left.
    Step 6. Stimulis from chicks lost (death) or reduced (chicks mature and voices change I think) - then step 2 (recondition)

    Molting, poor nutrition, cold tend to block step 2
     
  6. chickenlover4444

    chickenlover4444 Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Jul 1, 2011
    Ok thanks I am planning on getting her a few day old chicks to make her happy. [​IMG]
     
  7. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 26, 2009
    California
    Awww, Im glad youre going to get her some babies!!!! You will LOVE watching her with them!

    You might want to wait until she has gone to bed for the evening to switch out the eggs for the chicks so she will be much more likely to accept them as her own and so the chicks accept her as momma (Ive never had a problem w/day olds accepting a new momma though). Also, be sure there is food and water the chicks can reach since they may be used to eating already from the feed store conditions. The momma will still help them find food on the ground, but chicks need water they can reach all the time. You can offer them NON-medicated chickstarter in the same feeder the mom or other chickens may eat out of (shouldnt hurt the other chickens or momma at all, but medicated chick starter is bad, bad, bad for your hens in the respect that you cant eat their eggs if they have eaten medicated food, at least thats what Ive been told).

    Good luck and keep us posted!! [​IMG]
     
  8. chickenlover4444

    chickenlover4444 Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Jul 1, 2011
    ok thanks [​IMG]
     
  9. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,277
    7,733
    726
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    [​IMG] Depending upon the individual and breed hens can go broody many times in a year. The most successful broody that I ever had was a silky/game X that raised 5 broods of chicks in a season.
     
  10. Gingerlilypad

    Gingerlilypad Out Of The Brooder

    77
    6
    31
    Jun 20, 2011
    Central Mississippi
    I have one hen that stays broody. She free ranges, hides her nest, refuses to return to the pen at night, then keeps her babies hidden. I am now in the process of trying to catch some of her babies, since she teaches them to hide in brush.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by