Can abuse cause a rooster to quit crowing?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by lurae, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. lurae

    lurae Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 18, 2016
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    I had a housesitter for five days and came back from a very dominant and lively rooster ton one that no longer crows and appears a bit timid. He's eating/drinking fine but is no longer protective of his girls and doesn't "eyeball" me any more. I miss his crowing and also his watchful eye over the hens. Any ideas? He shows no outward signs of abuse. If it is mind-abuse and not physical damage, do you think he will eventually be his old crowing self? I have the one rooster and four hens.
     
  2. ChickenChaser9

    ChickenChaser9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That depends a lot on what happened to him tbh. Keep an eye on him and see, he may return to his normal activities in a few days. Stress from some kind of confrontation or abuse could theoretically cause this if it were sufficiantly traumatic.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2017
  3. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Interesting issue. If this rooster has suddenly become non-aggressive after he's been aggressive, then your house sitter probably administered some discipline. Do not assume the rooster was mistreated. If there are no signs of injury, it's doubtful he was abused. Discipline, which alters behavior, is entirely different from punishment, which can traumatize and injure.

    As for the crowing, this would fit with the rooster adopting new behavior. He will crow again once he feels secure in his new behavior. I suggest you talk with your house sitter and find out what manner of discipline they used, if any, and continue it. Far from being abusive, discipline is essential for toning down an aggressive rooster.
     
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  4. lurae

    lurae Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 18, 2016
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    Azygous, Thanks for the well thought out comments. I'll just be patient for the crowing return. I sent a message to the housesitter earlier this morning but have not heard back from her as yet. Would appreciate what forms of discipliine you have used for aggression that have worked for you. Thanks again! Lu
     
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Discipline consists of being firm and consistent. When a cockerel or rooster shows any aggressive behavior, even if it's something as seemingly insignificant as dancing up to you in a sideways maneuver, reach down and grab him up and stuff him under your arm with his head backwards. Carry him around like that while you do your chores and visit with the hens. This will take him down a peg or two in the eyes of the hens, and he will be humbled.

    Another good one is to push him to the ground, flattening him with his head on the dirt. Pin him there until he surrenders and becomes calm. Never release a rooster while he is struggling. Always wait for him to calm completely.

    Never hit a rooster. Never kick a rooster. Do not throw objects at a rooster. Do not lose your temper. Remain calm and deliberate in all your movements and behavior around a rooster. You may use a hose or squirt gun in a pinch. I like nerf guns with those foam darts. But personal contact is best when disciplining because he will then learn to respect you as boss. This is your ultimate goal.

    Roosters are quick studies. They are very smart. It doesn't take but a couple days, and he will fall into line. Once your roo has accepted discipline and his behavior is acceptable, meaning he will move out of your way as you move forward, ignore him. Ignoring a well behaved roo demonstrates that you respect him and the job he is doing. In return, he will respect you. Never handle a rooster after he has begun to come into his hormones unless it is absolutely necessary in order to address health issues.

    Folks hardly ever realize how easy it is to discipline a cockerel, and in return, have a well behaved rooster you can depend on to care for the flock.
     

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