Can anyone tell me what breeds my chickens are?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by AbiandAmi, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. AbiandAmi

    AbiandAmi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2013
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    My hens are about 25 weeks old and have been laying for about 2 weeks. the brown one has laid every day and the white one has skipped 2 days in the 2 weeks. their personalities are quite similar. very friendly (though I raised them from babies). they can both be very loud especially when they are about to lay or want attention!
    I think the white one is a leghorn but unsure about the brown one.
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  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Looks to me like you have a Red Sex Link, aka ISA Brown, Red Star, Golden Comet, etc different hatcheries have different names for their own particular cross. Agree the white looks like a White Leghorn. Both should be great egg layers for you.
     
  3. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Red Sex Link & White Leghorn
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'm guessing you're getting white and brown eggs? I agree, red sex link (brown eggs) and white leghorn (white eggs).
     
  5. AbiandAmi

    AbiandAmi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2013
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    Thanks so much! Yes I am getting brown eggs and white eggs:) they are fantastic layers! Can anyone tell me how long these breeds live for??
     
  6. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Red Sex-Links and Leghorns are very commercialized breeds. This means that they are bred to lay lots of eggs in a short time period. The two breeds, because of their high egg production, tend to have more egg-laying problems (like Egg Yolk Peronitis, Ascites, Egg Binding, etc) than heavier, less commericalized breeds. So, though many chickens could live for 10 + years (in theory--most don't live that long because they get eaten or people kill them because they are laying fewer eggs), I expect your birds will live less than five years. Still, it really depends on the individual bird and how well you care for them. With luck, they will live a long and happy life with you!
     
  7. AbiandAmi

    AbiandAmi Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2013
    Queensland, Australia
    Oh that is so sad:( I will definitely do everything I can to give them a long and happy life!! I'm not concerned if they stop laying, I just love them!!
    Do you have any tips on how to stop these problems from occurring? Or should I post this question somewhere else??
     
  8. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    There's really not much you can do--it just happens. Many breeds that you get from hatcheries are more susceptible to these types of things. I have four hatchery birds (a Silver-laced Wyandotte, Columbian Wyandotte, Easter Egger, and Rhode Island Red), and they are nearly three years old and still haven't had any problems. I haven't experienced any problems with them, but other people have. You might have more luck posting a thread specific to this question.
     
  9. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Do not force light on them in the winter. The less they lay early in their life, the less issues they will have.
     
  10. QuoVadis

    QuoVadis Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2 This will help. When I was still in high school we got a batch of chicks from McMurray, all different breeds. Of the 25 or so we got, 13 are still alive and kicking at my parents house, and some of them still lay, though not a lot. They are all about 8 years old now. (SL Wyandotte, Light Brahma, Black Sex link, New Hampshire, 2 EEs, Delaware, Buff Orpington, and various banties). I think not having a light in winter the first few years we had them has helped prolong their life. Of the ones who have died, close to half were predators, and mishaps (drowning in the steers water tank that they liked to perch on). A few just "dropped dead," and few became egg bound, internal layers, or just went downhill.
     

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