Can chickens take "Erythromycin Ethylsuccinate?"

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Kim Austin, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. Kim Austin

    Kim Austin In the Brooder

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    Can chickens take "ERYTHROMYCIN ETHYLSUCCINATE"?
     
  2. tridentk9

    tridentk9 Songster

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    May 2, 2014
    The first question should be is the bacteria causing the problem sensitive to erythromycin?
     
  3. tridentk9

    tridentk9 Songster

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    http://www.drugs.com/pro/gallimycin-pfc.html

    The product label does say eggs are no longer safe for consumption. No time limit so they mean forever. Personally, I wouldn't use the eggs on any species not just humans.

     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    According to this European link, erythromycin has a 6 day egg withdrawal period:
    http://www.interchemie.com/veterinary-products/poultry/gallimix-200-ws.html
    Another link I saw stated that it had a 1 day slaughter withdrawal period. Studies for egg withdrawal periods in most meds are too time consuming, expensive, as well as liability aspects for pharmaceutical companies to test these products.
    Another example is wazine. The label states not to eat the eggs after using the product. There's a 14 day slaughter withdrawal period stated on the bottle for chickens. If the chicken is good to eat after 14 days, so are the eggs.
    With erythromycin, either a 1 day or 6 day (European slaughter withdrawal period,) like wazine... if the meat is good to eat, so are the eggs.
    I've used wazine and other wormers in my birds and have eaten eggs after the withdrawal periods, still here typing. A lot of folks have eaten eggs directly after using antibiotics and wormers, that's their choice. I abide by slaughter withdrawal periods if there arnt any egg withdrawal periods.
    http://web2.uconn.edu/poultry/poultrypages/diseasefactsheet.html
    Scroll down to "Medications" in the above link.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  5. tridentk9

    tridentk9 Songster

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    Sounds reasonable with one caveat- I am not sure if or how but it is possible (again I don't know) that the hen can concentrate more of the medications in the egg than throughout the whole body. I probably wouldn't eat the liver or kidneys for a lot longer than the five day day washout period as most meds are filtered out by one or both of those organs.

    There is a huge difference between dewormers and antibiotics. ABs can and do affect more than just the original consumer of eggs or meat. Made worse by the human tendency to only treat until the patient is better and not finish recommended treatment times. Medicating this way only increases the percentage of resistent bugs, a very real worldwide threat.

    Sigh, I don't disagree with you- I disagree with the reasoning. Given the human body, there may still be a deleterious effect from the medications but cause and effect may be minimal in an adult or separated by time.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. tridentk9

    tridentk9 Songster

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    Possibly more information than you wanted. Basically drug residues depend on how a drug is absorbed and then excreted by the chicken. Since egg yolks start being formed weeks before the egg is laid, a drug can potentially show up in eggs for a month after the drug is stopped. Charts throughout the article are broken down by drug class and show how long most drugs used in chickens can be detected.

    From another article, the type of chicken, broiler vs layer, can also make a difference in excretion rate.



    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2885.2011.01287.x/full
     

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