Can Goats eat Horse Feed?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by kuntrygirl, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    I have a 50lb bag of Purina Strategy Healthy Edge Horse Feed and I was wondering can goats eat horse feed? The ingredients are listed below: Is there anything that goats should NOT eat?

    Crude Protein - 12.5%
    Lysine - 0.9%
    Crude Fat - 8.0%
    Crude Fiber - 18.0%
    Calcium - 2.24%
    Phosphorus - 0.6%
    Salt - 1.4%
    Copper 80.0000PPM
    Selenium - 0.6000PPM
    Zinc - 280.0000PPM
    Vitamin A - 3000.00 IU/LB
    Vitamin E - 125.00 IU/LB

    Other ingredients: Wheat middlings, Alfafa meal, ground soybean, cane molasses, beet pulp, ground rice hulls, soybean oil, ground corn, rice bran, flaxseed.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    The protien is low and the copper is high, but an occasional bag probably wouldn't hurt them

    I wouldn't substitute it totally


    http://goat.purinamills.com/OURPRODUCTS/PRODUCTS/GoatChow/default.aspx

    GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
    Crude protein Min 16.00%
    Crude fat Min 2.50%
    Crude fiber Max 9.00%
    Calcium (Ca) Min 0.80%
    Calcium (Ca) Max 1.30%
    Phosphorus (P) Min 0.60%
    Salt (NaCl) Min 0.75%
    Salt (NaCl) Max 1.25%
    Copper (Cu) Min 39.00ppm
    Copper (Cu) Max 42.00ppm
    Selenium (Se) Min 0.60ppm
    Vitamin A Min 4,000.00 IU/lb
     
  3. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Ok. I was just wondering. I received a few coupons in the mail for free horse feed but I don't have any horses. I didn't want to throw the coupons or feed away, so I was wondering if a cup full or two would be okay to feed them. I know that I can't feed it to my sheep because of the high levels of cooper but i knew that goats could eat cooper at a higher level than sheep. I'll still keep my goat on his current feeding regiment but if you think it's ok to feed it as a "treat", then I will try that and see how he likes it. I don't know of any other ingredients that will kill goats as cooper is deadly to sheep.
     
  4. chicnfarmer

    chicnfarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've heard that mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy, but I have no information about goats - unless the does are goats then goats eat oats too. Say THAT five times fast!
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2010
  5. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:[​IMG]
     
  6. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    My goats get into the horse feed from time to time and it didn't hurt them. However too much of it is not a good thing.

    Just supplement with your goat chow.
     
  7. cmjust0

    cmjust0 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    Central KY
    We can't get dairy goat feed here (one of few things we haven't been able to track down) so we feed milking does a mare & foal blend from the local feedmill. Horse feeds are more likely to be made with better ingredients than your average cattle feed or 'all stock'.. Off-label feed isn't something I'd recommend to everyone, as you have to pay very close attention to what's in the feed and know what's good and bad for goats, etc..

    The website lists the nutrition info on the mare & foal we use as follows:

    Protein: 16%
    Digestible Energy: 1370 kcal/lb
    Fat: 3.5%
    Fiber: 8%
    Calcium: 0.9%
    Phosphorus: 0.7%
    Zinc: 155 ppm
    Copper: 50 ppm
    Vitamin A: 8,750 IU/lb.
    Vitamin D: 1125 IU/lb.
    Vitamin E: 65 IU/lb.
    Selenium: 0.5 ppm

    I'm really picky about Ca:p ratios in my feeds, and I know the Ca:p ratio on it is wrong on this one. As such, it's NEVER fed to males -- only females in lactation, and only those we plan to millk for our own consumption.. I'm actually considering mixing in a little 17% dehydrated alfalfa pellet to bring the calcium up to a better ratio, as well as and bring the vitamin/mineral levels down a little bit. Might mix it in 1:4, or thereabout.

    Again, though...it can get tricky, and you kinda have to have an understanding of what goats need, what the soil in your area is lacking, how long you can feed certain things at certain levels, etc..

    I'm just getting to the point where I feel somewhat confident about doing stuff like this, and I've looked into it very, very extensively.
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    no information about goats -

    A kid'll eat ivy too [​IMG]
     
  9. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    Yes a doe is a goat and so is a kid.....well anyways they are kinda garbage guts but yeah grains and folage is what they eat.....They love crackers, bread, ice cream cones for treats some say not good for them will make them fat.

    Goats can have sweet grain or not sweet and all stock it is call ALL stock for a reason. Because it is for all live stock.....goats, sheep, cows, horses, pigs, etc.

    ETA: What you have there goats would love it!
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2010
  10. cmjust0

    cmjust0 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    Central KY
    Quote:[​IMG]

    Contrary to popular belief....no, they're really not.

    but yeah grains and folage is what they eat.....They love crackers, bread, ice cream cones for treats some say not good for them will make them fat.

    Not necessarily not good for them because it will make them fat...just not good for them, period. Most of that stuff is made with animal products. Not only is it not a good idea to feed animal parts back to ruminants, but it's also against federal law.

    Goats can have sweet grain or not sweet and all stock it is call ALL stock for a reason. Because it is for all live stock.....goats, sheep, cows, horses, pigs, etc.

    If it's for sheep, it's not for goats.. Sheep can't have copper; goats absolutely require copper. Therefore, if you keep your goats on a diet of all-stock, they will become copper deficient.

    Copper deficiency leads to all sorts of problems like lameness, reproductive issues, skin/coat issues, immune depression, higher parasite burden -- the list goes on.

    So, no...all-stock isn't for goats.​
     

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