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Can I prevent having baby chicks and still keep my rooster?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by dramamined, Sep 30, 2015.

  1. dramamined

    dramamined New Egg

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    Jun 11, 2015
    So, back in April I bought a couple of lil chickies through someone on craigslist, I was told they should both be female (I know, I know), buuuut now they are about 5.5 months old and one of them is definitely a rooster. I love them and they love each other, they're not fully mature yet obviously, but I know that time will come, and they are more than likely going to mate. I don't want to have to separate them, but I also don't want to have to deal with my hen having chicks.

    I'm here to ask you all, is there any way I can keep both of them and prevent them from having babies? Any advice is welcome. Thanks y'all!!



    -Myranda

    p.s. this is them: when I first got them in April, and the most recent photos I have available from late July

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Yes - you can easily prevent chicks by simply collecting eggs daily. Development does not start until the eggs are incubated - collecting them every day prevents that from ever happening (as does the matter of having to have your hen actually go broody, feeling the hormonal drive to set on and hatch eggs - which may not happen). Now, yes, I said "eggs" even though you only have one hen because the bigger issue is the fact that you have a situation where the potential for over-breeding of the hen is a problem. Are you limited on the number of birds you can have for your locality? If so, what is that limit? What housing do you have for your birds - this will play into any potential expansion of the flock with adding more hens?
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. dramamined

    dramamined New Egg

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    Jun 11, 2015
    Ah, thanks for that bit of information! I did not know that. So, even if they do mate, only one egg will come daily, and it won't be a chick as long as it's not incubated?
    I'm unsure of what the policy may be in my area, but I did not have any plans to get any more chickens right away. I'm actually about to move into a temporary housing situation, was planning on building a reasonably sized tractor coop suitable for transportation and for them. They will be able to free range in the back yard still, as well.
    I was unaware of over breeding as a problem- is this always a thing with a small flock that has a rooster?
     
  4. dramamined

    dramamined New Egg

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    Jun 11, 2015
    Ah, thanks for that bit of information! I did not know that. So, even if they do mate, only one egg will come daily, and it won't be a chick as long as it's not incubated?
    I'm unsure of what the policy may be in my area, but I did not have any plans to get any more chickens right away. I'm actually about to move into a temporary housing situation, was planning on building a reasonably sized tractor coop suitable for transportation and for them. They will be able to free range in the back yard still, as well.
    I was unaware of over breeding as a problem- is this always a thing with a small flock that has a rooster?
     
  5. NatureChica

    NatureChica Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes...almost always the rooster wants to fertilize the hens and unless there are enough hens for him to mount he will stress the hens out, possibly injure them and in certain instances it results in death of the hen.
    The stress may cause her to quit laying, pull her own feathers out...it's really not a good situation for the poor girl.
     
  6. dramamined

    dramamined New Egg

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    Jun 11, 2015
    oh, man. what might be a good ratio? 2 more hens? 3?
     
  7. jrjoplin

    jrjoplin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A rooster mates when he wants and can be aggressive. If there are multiple hens that "attention" gets spread around. With only one hen for him to mate with she gets it all. You'll need to watch her for feather loss and any wounds he may cause. I've heard of small flocks that this hasn't been a huge issue but you'll need to keep an eye out.

    If your thinking of adding a good ratio is about 1:6-8

    You may want to check the local regulations regarding chickens more specifically roosters. Many cities limit rooster keeping as they are viewed as a nuisance.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
  8. Free Feather

    Free Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think you would be fine with just one more hen. With bantams, you can keep just pairs, but large fowl boys are more rowdy because they are not as courteous and gentlemanly as their ancestors. Since he is the only rooster, he will not mate a much as a rooster who has competition. It would not hurt to have one more chicken, anyway, in case one dies so that there will still be two to keep each other company. Just try a trio and see how it goes in your situation.
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    My Coop
    It can depend on the cockerel, he may be very aggressive or he may not.....
    ......but I would be ready to isolate him away from the pullet at a moments notice,
    because when things get ugly they can get very ugly, very fast.

    Might be good to have a folding wire dog crate handy to isolate him.

    Concerned that if you don't have adequate housing for them going into winter, might not be the best time to have chickens.
     

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