Can I put a wood Bottom on a raised garden plot I'm building?

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by kelseygirl707, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. kelseygirl707

    kelseygirl707 Dances with Chickens

    Mar 3, 2009
    Lakeport, Ca.
    Hey guys and gals!

    So the house we rent is landscaped in rock [​IMG] , but this year I really want a veggie garden, so I am going to build a raised garden plot. But my problem is that if/when we move some day, I don't know that our landlords would be OK with us leaving the plot behind, so I want it to be as easy as possible to scoop the dirt out, to move it. I know I can put plastic down to keep the dirt seperate from the rock, but can I just put like a piece of 3/4 in plywood on the bottom? Or will the veggie roots have issues with that? As you can tell, I was raised a city slicker [​IMG]

    Thanks!
     
  2. MyKidLuvsGreenEgz

    MyKidLuvsGreenEgz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Be sure to make it deep enough. Most veggies are ok with 18"-24" of GOOD quality soil. Check out square foot gardening (don't spend the money, just get the book at the library by Mel somebody. Even has demonstrations of table-top garden beds for people in wheelchairs.

    I use containers for almost everything. Instead of building things, I go to the dollar store and get huge buckets. Makes things more portable, and good for moving things indoor before the first frost (to extend harvest season). Almost everything can go into containers.
     
  3. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Good for you, getting a garden going!

    Have you thought about using buckets and pots for planting? REALLY easy to move around and move later on.

    Be sure to check out the BYC sister site, www.theeasygarden.com
     
  4. kelseygirl707

    kelseygirl707 Dances with Chickens

    Mar 3, 2009
    Lakeport, Ca.
    Thanks guys!

    Yah I thought about buckets, but honestly I need a big project. I am board out of my mind! So building is half the fun, lol. So if I make it 2 feet deep, and use a mixture of quality soil and my inlaws horse maure compost, I should be good? [​IMG]
     
  5. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Sheesh, I forgot. Sorry for getting sidetracked. [​IMG]

    No, I wouldn't use plywood, have you looked at the price lately? [​IMG]
    Also, if it is treated, it will leach chemicals into the soil and the plant roots will soak it up. If it's untreated, it will break down in no time flat and the soil will filter/wash out. Either way, plywood is just thin layers of wood glued together and that glue, whatever it is, will also break down into the soil.

    My DH is a painter. All of the 5 gallon latex paint buckets get scrubbed, holes drilled and become planters.
     
  6. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Quote:[​IMG] Just read your siggy - your big project will be here soon and you won't be bored at all! Congratulations!
     
  7. kelseygirl707

    kelseygirl707 Dances with Chickens

    Mar 3, 2009
    Lakeport, Ca.
    Quote:Hmmm, What if I use treated Plywood (We have a couple sheets in our garage) but with gardening plastic over it, that way I have a strong barrier between the rocks and the dirt.
     
  8. kelseygirl707

    kelseygirl707 Dances with Chickens

    Mar 3, 2009
    Lakeport, Ca.
    Quote:[​IMG] Just read your siggy - your big project will be here soon and you won't be bored at all! Congratulations!

    LOL, that is why I need this project, to distract me for the next 4 months [​IMG]
     
  9. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    That would work but frankly, as high as plywood has gone, I wouldn't waste it on a garden. I'd save it for another coop! [​IMG]

    The other argument against simple box type raised beds is that they need major reinforcement. It's not just nailing a few strips together and you're done. Mine were a booger to build, and I had to learn the hard way since I didn't realize the soil would "lean" outward and collapse the walls.

    Now if you were to make several smaller ones, and line them with heavy plastic, that might work except........ it's going to interfere with drainage. And if you DO poke holes for drainage you once again have the leaching problem. [​IMG]

    Let me and others think on it. Meanwhile, check out the easy garden link, I haven't been there in a while but I'm ranchhand there, too. And they have some incredibly good ideas.
     
  10. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    Landscape fabric works for me, to keep soil in and let water out. I lined my raised planter with it. I also use pieces of it in the bottom of my pots, to cover the holes.
     

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