Can I use an 18 gauge needle on a bantam rooster?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by InsaneBreeder, Nov 21, 2010.

  1. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I need to administer penicillin, and the lady at the feedstore said that I needed 18 gauge needles for penicillin, so I got them. When I was reading about how to administer it, the articles I was reading said to administer it using a 20 gauge needle or higher. So can I not use the 18 gauge needles? Do I need to get a higher gauge?
     
  2. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

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    you can use 18 gauge on bantams yes. Sometimes the thickness of the medicine forces you to use the large size needle. I know my LA-200 has to have 20 or less (larger)
     
  3. SeaHen

    SeaHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The 18-gauge needle is huge, even for a human. I'm guessing you were told to use it because the penicillin is viscous and difficult to push through. I'm sorry, I have no experience injecting chickens and am having difficulty picturing the procedure. What is the reason for not giving an antibiotic orally?
     
  4. hongyush2008

    hongyush2008 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Well, as i see, 18 gauge is enough, don't worry.
     
  5. edselpdx

    edselpdx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It'll be fine. 18 gauge is not so huge and will be just fine. Trying to push a viscous med through a 22 gauge is worse.
     
  6. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kurtistown, Hawaii
    Thanks for all your advice!

    SeaHen: I read that giving penicillin orally can have a detrimental impact on the bacteria in a bird's intestinal tract and that the injectable type is less harmful in that manner.
     
  7. tammyd57

    tammyd57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Injectable anti-biotics can also wreak havoc with a bird's good bacteria. Start giving cultured yogurt to help balance the gut again. They'll think they're getting a treat [​IMG]
     
  8. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Injectable anti-biotics can also wreak havoc with a bird's good bacteria. Start giving cultured yogurt to help balance the gut again. They'll think they're getting a treat [​IMG]

    Thanks for telling me. I will definitely give him some.
     
  9. spoggy

    spoggy d'Anver d'Nut

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    Quote:Injectable anti-biotics can also wreak havoc with a bird's good bacteria. Start giving cultured yogurt to help balance the gut again. They'll think they're getting a treat [​IMG]

    Be prepaired for diarrhea. Chickens are incapable of digesting lactose, they lack the needed enzymes. Essentially, all chickens are lactose-intolerant, so very small amounts is the way to go.
     
  10. tammyd57

    tammyd57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Injectable anti-biotics can also wreak havoc with a bird's good bacteria. Start giving cultured yogurt to help balance the gut again. They'll think they're getting a treat [​IMG]

    Be prepaired for diarrhea. Chickens are incapable of digesting lactose, they lack the needed enzymes. Essentially, all chickens are lactose-intolerant, so very small amounts is the way to go.

    Yes, only small amounts for several days is plenty. I wouldn't give more than a teaspoon or so at a time.
     

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