can I use chicken manure from coop in my garden??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by SuburbanSue, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. SuburbanSue

    SuburbanSue Out Of The Brooder

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    If not straight from it, what would I have to do to make is usable at some point? Is it possible?

    Thanks- Sue
     
  2. Chickens? WOW

    Chickens? WOW Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 21, 2010
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    I have heard that chicken manure is a "hot" manure and before use should be allowed to age at least one year before putting in the garden. You need to let it mellow because of its high ammonia content. It works as an excellent ground cover in wintertime, keeps the weeds down until you start to weed good luck!
     
  3. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    I've used it right from the coop by taking the hose and kind of made a slurry - about the consistency and color of split pea soup - and applied it to the ground at the base of my tomatoes - and they loved it and took off!! However, I've read on this site that applying it makes the plants grow but also makes them set fruit later, so don't go by me. I think a lot of people till it into the garden soil in the fall so the garden will grow like heck next spring.
     
  4. jasonm11

    jasonm11 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    make a poop tea, equal parts water and poop in a miracle grow hose sprayer that hooks up to garden hose and go to it. Let it sit and brew for a day or so before use.
     
  5. aggie9296

    aggie9296 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Straight is fine, in SMALL amounts or it will burn the plants. I put a couple of poop balls in my planters for flowers and under shrubs etc. Can compost the rest for later use.
     
  6. Country Heart

    Country Heart City Girl With A

    I compost mine for a month or two first.
     
  7. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Chickens? WOW :

    I have heard that chicken manure is a "hot" manure and before use should be allowed to age at least one year before putting in the garden. You need to let it mellow because of its high ammonia content. It works as an excellent ground cover in wintertime, keeps the weeds down until you start to weed good luck!

    It is high in nitrogen and can burn the plants. It doesn't have a "high ammonia content". Ammonia is NH3, when you smell ammonia you are losing nitrogen into the air.

    It's generally not recommended to use fresh animal manure on gardens within 120 days of harvest to avoid contamination of produce by pathogens and parasites (listeria, salmonella, e. coli, tapeworms, roundworms, etc.). Either turn it into the soil late in the fall or very early in the spring, or compost it ensuring it reaches high temps to kill pathogens. When properly composted it can be applied during the growing season.​
     
  8. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Quote:It is high in nitrogen and can burn the plants. It doesn't have a "high ammonia content". Ammonia is NH3, when you smell ammonia you are losing nitrogen into the air.

    It's generally not recommended to use fresh animal manure on gardens within 120 days of harvest to avoid contamination of produce by pathogens and parasites (listeria, salmonella, e. coli, tapeworms, roundworms, etc.). Either turn it into the soil late in the fall or very early in the spring, or compost it ensuring it reaches high temps to kill pathogens. When properly composted it can be applied during the growing season.

    This is essentially wrong. With a horticulturalist and Master Gardener in the family I can tell you with some sureness that chicken and most bird manure is indeed "hot" and will burn plants when fresh if you use too much or allow it to touch the plants. Whether you want to call it Nitrogen or Ammonia is immaterial to the fact that it will burn your plants. It isn't only the chance of pathogens that creates that recommendation.

    The amount of time it's aged before use in the garden depends largely on how it's aged. If it's composted in a good, hot, compost then only a few weeks is needed. If you pile it in a garage and leave it, much more time will likely need to pass. But you can, as has been stated, turn it under 3 months before planting and be safe. I put a little on my rosebeds (only around about a cup per plant, and spread out) but use it for compost tea also.
     
  9. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:So, which part was wrong? You just reiterated what I just said...
     
  10. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Quote:It is high in nitrogen and can burn the plants. It doesn't have a "high ammonia content". Ammonia is NH3, when you smell ammonia you are losing nitrogen into the air.

    It's generally not recommended to use fresh animal manure on gardens within 120 days of harvest to avoid contamination of produce by pathogens and parasites (listeria, salmonella, e. coli, tapeworms, roundworms, etc.). Either turn it into the soil late in the fall or very early in the spring, or compost it ensuring it reaches high temps to kill pathogens. When properly composted it can be applied during the growing season.

    This is pretty much what the Ag Extension folks and the State Ag Universities all recommend. [​IMG]
     

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