Can I Use Landscape Timbers for Fence Posts?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Raven1, May 12, 2009.

  1. Raven1

    Raven1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I want to build a 50x100 ft area to divide into breeder runs and a large "free range" area that will be use on alternate days. How long would the timbers last? 4x4x8's and 7 1/2ft T-post are $6.00 ea. and the timbers are 8ft. and will only run approx. $3.00 ea. so a huge cost savings but if they wont last then....
     
  2. rufus

    rufus Overrun With Chickens

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    For the difference in money, I would use the T post. I haven't seen a termite eat one yet.

    Rufus
     
  3. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My landscape timbers have been up for 8 years now and still going strong, the part in the ground is in concrete.

    I don't know what a T-Post is, the only thing that comes to mind when you say T-Post are the metal clothesline posts.
     
  4. Raven1

    Raven1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Did you do anything else to the timbers before sinking them in concrete?
    My DH thinks they will rot very soon 8yrs and going strong sounds good. They are pressure treated just like the 4x4s . The T-post are what we use to put up cattle fence
     
  5. rufus

    rufus Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:T post are fence posts made of metal, they last forever. Google fencing supplies.

    Rufus
     
  6. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No not a thing. I did buy the ones that are pretreated for insects. Here they sell them either as pressure treated or pressure treated and dipped in a insecticide.

    I think the fact that I used quickcrete to set them instead of just tamping down dirt protects them from the insects and to some extent wetness. The place I previously lived at the timbers were on their 10th year when I sold the place and no issues.
     
  7. Raven1

    Raven1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much I will have my DH read this so he will see that maybe I'm not crazy [​IMG]
    I would use the T-posts but the cost is too high!
     
  8. davidr

    davidr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Installing wood posts with or without concrete is more labor intensive and time consuming than installing the same number of "Tee" posts.

    I think the cost of a wood post plus concrete will be pretty close to a "Tee" post.

    David
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2009
  9. chickens3

    chickens3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would say about 3 years.
     
  10. Im4Eggcellence

    Im4Eggcellence Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know... that's a lot of work, sounds like you'll be putting in 40+ posts. Think about it this way.... would you install all those posts for $3 each for someone else? Cause that's essentially what you will be doing if they fail in 8-10 years and you have to re-do it. Well worse, actually cause you have to re-purchase materials too.

    So how long to you actually need it to last?
     

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