Can internal layers still produce normal eggs sometimes? And if so, are they edible (if she has EYP)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JenHP, Mar 17, 2012.

  1. JenHP

    JenHP Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 21, 2012
    Hydesville, CA
    Hi all,
    I have a hen (Betty, Black Australorp) that I believe has recently developed an internal laying issue. For a couple weeks I have gotten several shell-less eggs dropped from the roost at night. Up until today I had no idea who was doing this as everyone seemed norma and happyl. Today Betty has been somewhat listless and stiff when she walks so I can only assume she is the one. She won't let me catch her so I am waiting until she's on the roost to get her and bring her inside for a better examination. In doing internet research today on egg yolk peritonitis I read that hens with this often have a high incidence of double yolks. I have been getting a gigantic double yolker every 7-10 days, and just got one 2 days ago. I don't know for sure if Betty is producing these but it seems like that might be a logical conclusion. If Betty is developing or has EYP, which is bacterial, is it still safe to eat her eggs? Other than the double yolkers I have no idea which eggs might be hers, which would mean all my eggs are now inedible? I tried searching the forum for this info but only got a ton of generic threads about internal laying and honestly don't have the time or inclination to read through the hundreds or thousands of replies in the hope of finding the answer to this question. Helpful advice on this question as well as managing this condition would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. jak2002003

    jak2002003 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 24, 2009
    Thailand
    I am not really sure if they would be safe to eat or not.

    To solve the problem I would put that hen in a separate cage so you will know the other eggs are not from her.

    I hope she gets better soon!
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Yes, it is safe to eat her eggs, if she is actually laying, unless you are giving her antibiotics. They don't often lay normal eggs once they start that cycle because the oviducts become blocked completely with gunk.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2012
  4. JenHP

    JenHP Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 21, 2012
    Hydesville, CA
    Thank you speckledhen. I would have thought that if the egg yolks are coming from a bacterial environment of EYP that any eggs formed would be contaminated with bacteria. Do you know how that would not be the case? My shell-less egg issue has been going on for a couple weeks and I know this girl has laid at least one egg during that time because I have had at least one day when I got an egg from all 7 of my girls. I have seen other posts from you on the issue of internal laying so I know you have experience and knowledge with it. Does my issue of getting many shell-less eggs dropped from the roost at night sound like internal laying to you? I am a pretty new chicken keeper and this is my first go-round with any sickness so I am trying to learn as much as possible. Thank you in advance for any knowledge and advice you can pass along [​IMG]
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    A bird who is still laying isn't necessarily laying internally just yet, even if the eggs have no shell, but it's not a good sign, for sure. One of my own hens who died from it (we did necropsy her) started out with eggs with no shell at first, then she couldn't lay, kept going on the nest without producing one, then she quit going, started to lose massive amounts of weight in spite of eating well, then became very weak and died.

    There simply is no egg to eat if a hen is laying internally 99% of the time. I never eat the shell-less ones since they haven't had any protection from bacteria that may be in the nest, even if I get them in the house intact.
     

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