Can MS spread to flock??!! PLEASE HELP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by alanawesen, Sep 2, 2016.

  1. alanawesen

    alanawesen Just Hatched

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    2 days ago I took in a hen from a friend who only had her left. A raccoon attack killed all of the rest and she was living alone. She as all of the symptoms of MS (Pale, limping, lump on joint). This must have been caused by the stress of the attack. When we brought her home we put her in a separate cage in the garage just to rid her of bacteria. We just found out about the disease and I am worried terribly. None of my flock has MS that I know of, and I read that it can spread fast! Can this new bird effect my flock! Can it be treated?? It hurts me terribly that I would have to give her back to her miserable lonely life. Please answer quickly. Thank you everyone.
     
  2. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If she's infected I would cull her. Returning her will only lead her to a miserable solitary existence, or in the chance the owner repopulates her flock - she infects an entirely new generation of birds. Keep her quarantined for a while and monitor her - change clothes and wash up before going to your regular flock after you interact with the new bird.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Can you post any pictures of the swollen joint? Mycoplasma synoviae should cause swelling in more than one joint. Limping can also be a symptom of a sprain, break in a leg, or an injury. Pallor is not necessarily a symptom of MS. If in doubt of the hen's health, you could get her tested for MS by your vet or through the state vet.
     
  4. alanawesen

    alanawesen Just Hatched

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    Thank you for your response! I will get a picture tomorrow. Yes, she does limp. I'm not sure if I see any other swollen areas though.
     
  5. alanawesen

    alanawesen Just Hatched

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    Thank you so much for responding! Yes, the last thing I wan't to do is return her, but culling is not an option for me. I will do everything I can to fix things, I am just worried that the other birds will get infected
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2016
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Mycoplasma synoviae can be treated with Tylan 50 injectable , given 1 ml per every 5 lb of weight,twice a day for 5 days. I would give it orally, instead of injecting it. Oxytetracycline can also be used instesd in the water. A vet or local extension agent could help in getting testing done for MS. As long as you keep her separate and use good handwashing, there are less chances of contamination.
     
  7. alanawesen

    alanawesen Just Hatched

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    Here are the pictures. You can see pus in the first one, after I took the pics I sprayed some peroxide as well as applying antibiotic cream and a bandage. We have also been giving her oral antibiotics for hens twice a day.
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    Again, thank you so much for your help!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2016
  8. alanawesen

    alanawesen Just Hatched

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    We let our hens free range, so if they go up to the cage would it be an issue??
     
  9. ladyearth

    ladyearth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what is that pink patch on her in that picture? lat picture?
    just a wundering
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    In my post above I stated wrong that a pale comb and skin is not a sign of MS, but it actually is. Green diarrhea is also a sign. Pus in the joint like your picture can be common in MS. It is hard to keep MS from spreading without pretty strict isolation.
     

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