Can red sex links go broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Chickadee-23, Feb 28, 2015.

  1. Chickadee-23

    Chickadee-23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 1 red sex link & 2 RIRs, everytime i go to feed them my RSL is always sitting in her nest but before i leave she comes out to eat then she goes back in while I'm feeding the other chickens, i was told this breed is non brooder, but is it possible shes going broody? She sitting on bout 8 eggs now!! Thanks
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Although they are generally non broody, sex links occasionally go broody as do individuals in other so called 'non broody' breeds or crosses. So, yes she may be going broody.
     
  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Although I find my commercial 'non-broody' types tend to sulk more than actually produce a profitable brood. They never seem to have hormones strong enough to produce a deep enough and lasting enough brood...but I have had 2 BSL's really brood...although 1 quit before hatch and I had to substitute at the last minute with a willing Silkie.

    LofMc
     
  4. LoveThemBirds

    LoveThemBirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All chickens can brood.Do they choose to do it always?No.

    Most breeds are less familiar with this for some reason.
    My red sex link hen brooded at a year old.She is one of the "dominant hens,so she really protects theflock.She uses these ttactics to defend her nest....
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Actually commercial breeds have been carefully selected away from broodiness because a broody hen is not a laying hen and therefore not a productive hen (for eggs).

    That is why you rarely get a broody Production Red or White Leghorn or RSL or BR...the industry has been selecting for prolific laying which deselects for broodiness.

    It takes the right genetics to create the proper hormone balance for a hen to actually settle into a deep brood that will sit for 24 hours for 21 days to hatch chicks....then mother those chicks.

    This is different than dominant nest behavior which is simply insisting the nest is yours when you want it, and you want it whenever anyone shows interest....but not sitting in a deep trance round the clock. Many brooding hens barely notice others, many scream in hostile anger if anyone comes near their nest. But all brooding hens will sit 24/7 for 3 weeks getting up once a day or even once every several days to quickly eat/drink and leave one monumental and stinky poo to immediately go back to the nest to incubate those eggs.

    To have the genetics for that, you typically have to look at the "heritage" breeds or game breeds or the orientals like Silkies and Cochins.

    But occasionally, the genetics are passed down to a commercial breed hen, and yes, she can go broody...but as I've stated previously, in my experience they do not have the sticking power but sulk more than produce a productive brood that will hatch chicks.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015
  6. kfc4me

    kfc4me New Egg

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    Yes. My RSL literally just hatched out 8 of 10 eggs. Was she the most diligent broody hen I've ever had? No. She would get up longer and stay gone longer than my Buff Orp. who goes into some kind of zen like Buddhist trance. When she went broody I thought she'd give up, but 3 weeks later I figured I'd give her some eggs to just get it over with. So, will they...yes...Is it likely the breed will...no. However, If she sleeping in the nest box on her own give her some eggs and let nature take its course. I realize that this is long since over and more so posting for future inquiries.
     

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