Can rooster be kept together?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Serenity06, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Serenity06

    Serenity06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 12 hens, 2 pullets, 1 rooster, and 1 cockerel. Can the rooster and cockerel be kept together? Right now the cockerel is in a much smaller coop and run with the 2 pullets. If I move them in with the rest of the chickens will they fight after the cockerel gets older? If so then what else can I do? I know he shouldn't be kept with just 2 hens, but the run they're in now is too small for more than 3 chickens.
     
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    If you put them together they will fight to establish pecking order, as will the hens and pullets. Typically, this is no big deal, although the older rooster is usually the alpha. We have 2 roosters and three cockerels and a bunch of hens and pullets, they all get along, although the cockerels were with the flock since they fledged from their mother. The only real way you will know is to put them together and see. Stay with them for a while, or go out there to watch them every once in a while over a period of a couple of days, til you see how it plays out. Most of the time, it's fine, but it just depends on the individuals. Ideally, there should be 12 hens for every cockerel or rooster, but that is not necessarily set in stone. They can get along with less. If they don't get along, you can keep the cockerel and his two pullets separate, and they will be fine with just the three of them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  3. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2 Occasionally some won't get along but I've usually had at least one rooster and a backup with my flock and sometimes then I hatch I seem to be overrun with boys. Once they establish a pecking order they get along. If I have to many for the hens I move them into a bachelor pad.
    It's interesting how several roosters will often work in tandem to protect their flock.
     
  4. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    It is cool to see them work together to protect the hens. I've seen a group of hens out foraging, with a rooster posted on every side of the group, facing in different directions, to keep a lookout! I've also seen the boys sacrifice themselves to a predator while the girls escape. Very sad, but very valiant.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    How old is the cockerel?
    Do you free range?
    How big is the larger coop/run?

    Space a can have a big effect...the more space the better.
    But it will really boil down to the demeanor's of the males whether or not they find some harmony.

    At least you'll have the smaller coop/run to isolate the 'extra' male if necessary.
    Seriously consider if you need 2 males.
     
  6. Serenity06

    Serenity06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The cockerel is almost 4 months old.
    I let them free range sometimes. About every other day for a few hours.
    The run is 40'×18'

    I put them in there a few days ago so everyone is still trying to establish pecking order. I'm not worried about them right now, but I do worry about when he gets older and decides he wants to be boss. Do I have enough space and hens for them?
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Run size sounds great, especially if it's not just a big empty space, but with 'things' in it for diversion and to get up and away and/or out of sight.
    How big is the coop?

    There's no telling if there's 'enough' females for the 2 males...much depends on the birds demeanor's.
    But like I said, at least you have the smaller coop and run to put any 'problem' birds into(most likely one of the males).
    At 4 months that cockerel is close to getting 'cocky'...so be ready.

    Is there a reason you need 2 males?
     
  8. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are some roosters out there who just will not stand for another rooster on their turf.While some do not really care,but occasion have to put their foot down and keep the pecking order straight.

    If the subordinate roo can submit,and keep himself to his own harem,things should work out,but cocky young ones really get on older roo nerves.4 to 10 months is probably the most stressful time for the adult roosters,you,and the hens as the cockerels go about raping,fighting the dominant man and the hens gaining status,and may even test you,just be ready.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  9. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What breed is he?
     
  10. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The main reason there is ratio is not for peace between the boys,it's so there is not any over mating.Although keeping a obvious amount of hens with roosters is a good idea.You cannot really determine if they will get along because you went by some hen and roo ratio.But it's obvious if you have 1 hen for 2 boys,the hen is obvious gonna get oevrmated,but that isn't saying the boys will not get along (Although if there is a legit one hen to court around,that more then likely will stir problems,but that is common sense once you learn about chickens and roosters.)
     

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