Can someone help me identify what I'm dealing with (pic included)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by nancyrat, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. nancyrat

    nancyrat Chirping

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    We rescued an older rooster a couple years ago. He had bad leg mites, we treated him and he did much better and life went on. A while ago, we noticed a large dark growth (hard almost like a calcified growth) (Picture 0693) on the top of his foot/leg. He acted like it hurt and limped. We started putting some corona on it unsure what else to do and it softened and came off. It left a bare spot that scabbed over and we thought he was on the mend. Then it never really healed and we would clean it, add some antiseptic (Corona) and wrap it. It never really healed and then it started growing this cheezy looking stuff on top (pictures 1645 & 1646) and when I soaked it in Epson salt it came off. Picture 1652 is after the growth was removed. We started soaking him in Epson salt with dawn antibacterial soap. Then I would put some chlorihexidine antiseptic on it and let it sit a minute then I would spray with MicrocyAH and wrap it, changing wrap three times a day. The bottoms of his feet are clear (1654) and I don't see swelling anywhere else. It is and isn't doing better. The cheesy stuff is not growing back as fast but is trying (1674) and I am about ready to simply euthanize my boy because I don't know what else to do for him. We've been battling this for several weeks now...two months? Wondering if it is a cancer or something....
     

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  2. azygous

    azygous Free Ranging

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    Beside the obvious infection of his foot, how is he acting otherwise? Eating okay? Active? Or lethargic and standing around mute and fluffed up with eyes closed?

    You are dealing with bumblefoot, a staph bacterial infection most likely. Serious cases can take weeks or months or even longer to clear up. Sometimes the immune system requires an assist with an oral antibiotic.

    The best treatment involves daily soaking and debriding of the wound. That means removing all dead tissue and pus each day after soaking in warm Epsom salts.

    Using topical antiseptics along with bandaging the foot to keep it clean and free of continuing exposure to bacteria is the most effective. Amoxicillin or penicillin are effective against staph. If the infection appears to be resistant, a stronger antibiotic could be obtained with a vet's prescription. Many of us use this place for our chicken meds, even though they are for fish. https://pet-healthcare.revivalanimal.com/search?p=Q&ts=custom&w=fish antibiotics
     
  3. BarnhartChickens98

    BarnhartChickens98 Songster

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    Did the scales never grow back from the previous bout of scaly mites? That foot looks pretty unhealthy, long nails/spurs and lots of missing scales.
     
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  4. nancyrat

    nancyrat Chirping

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    No, he had them pretty bad. He didn't want to walk or stand much. We treated him and he bounced back and has been fine until this started.
     
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  5. nancyrat

    nancyrat Chirping

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    Thank you for your response. I wondered about bumble foot but the bottoms of his feet look fine and I don't see pictures with the yellow/fleshy/cheesy stuff that grows on top. I almost wondered if it was a fungus?

    He eats good and acts pretty normal most of the time, crowing, running around with the girls, etc. Some days, however, I notice the foot bothers him more than others and he stands with his foot up and doesn't move around a lot, but I wouldn't call him lethargic or sleepy. He acts healthy otherwise. We had been treating and changing his bandage daily and wrapping his foot so he could run with the others. But we realized it probably wasn't enough (obviously because it wasn't healing) so we have been keeping him in a separate cage in the garage with clean chips, food and water. It makes it easier to treat him throughout the day but I hate keeping him cooped up …. I've been soaking him once a day and changing bandage 3x a day applying the antiseptic and microcynAH - Other than finding him some antibiotics, do you have any suggestions for a better antiseptic or medicine to put on the wound?
     
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  6. HeyHo

    HeyHo Songster

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    I have no advice to offer, but just wanted to let you know I think you're doing a great job! What a lucky rooster to have such a devoted caretaker! He must be very friendly to let you do all of that to him.
     
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  7. azygous

    azygous Free Ranging

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    First, bumblefoot can happen anywhere on the foot. Some of the worst cases I've seen are on top of the foot.

    The cheesy stuff is pus from the infection. It's not a fungus. It's likely staph or E-coli. Both bacteria are stubborn and prone to resistance to antibiotics. I recommend starting him on amoxicillin for a ten day round to give his immune system an assist trying to combat the infection.

    A crucial part of bumblefoot treatment involves debriding. That's where you remove as much of any dead tissue and pus as you can once a day or at least every two days after soaking. For nasty cases, I soak in Epsom salt and Betadine for twenty minutes. That softens the dead tissue and loosens the pus so it can be carved away with a sharp scraper or a thumbnail, which is what I do. (Care needs to be taken that no cuts on your hand come into contact with the bacteria or you will end up the patient.)

    Leaving the necrotic tissue and pus invites an environment that supports bacteria instead of discouraging it. The longest case of bumblefoot I treated was two years. Yeah, it wore me out. She wasn't my chicken when she wounded her foot. She was only treated after I adopted this hen at five years. You can expect your rooster's case to take at the very least several months to conquer.

    I've never kept a bumblefoot patient segregated from their flock. After spraying Vetericyn, let dry, then smoothing on an antibiotic ointment, I place a non-stick pad over the wound and bandage securely with Vetrap cut into one inch wide by twenty-inch long strips so no dirt can get to the wound. The bandage gets changed every two days at minimum when the foot gets soaked and debrided.
     
  8. Abriana

    Abriana Spicy Sugar Cookie

    Vitamin E is what I would do. Rub it on maybe three times per day and make sure he doesn't wipe it off on anything. It helps to heal skin.
     
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  9. nancyrat

    nancyrat Chirping

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    You've been very informational and helpful! You previously gave me a on-line address to order anitbiotics (for fish)….How much amoxicillin would you administer and how do you do it? Thank you so much for the info, it feels sometimes like I'm shooting in the dark! - I just hope it doesn't take 2 years! The hardest part is soaking but he is getting to where I think he enjoys it. I've kept him separate because I've been changing his bandage 3 xs a day and it is difficult to keep him corralled or catch him. But I will let him out with his girls (foot wrapped of course). Again, Thank you so much...
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
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  10. nancyrat

    nancyrat Chirping

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    He's a good boy and he's pretty. I have no idea what kind he is...but I dont' care. Thanks for the encouragement.
     
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