can someone please explain lavender ameraucana genetics for me?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by krstms, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. krstms

    krstms MO Hick Chick

    Sep 23, 2009
    Missouri
    If I breed a split to a split it makes blacks and lavs right? Well what if I bred a split to a black or blue? Would it still produce blue and black like normal blacks or not. Also if you breed a lav to a lav does it always breed true and make lav babies? I am a dummy with genetics. Any help would be appreciated. What about lavs to blues or normal blacks. ARe they all technically in the same gene pool like BBS? Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Tempe, Arizona
    Do you understand a punnet square?

    No, lavender is a separate gene than blue (which creates blue and splash, and its absence leaves black feathers undiluted).

    Lavender has absolutely NO affect when present in only one copy. Except for breeding records or results, there is no way to know it is present in a bird if the bird has only one copy.
     
  3. krstms

    krstms MO Hick Chick

    Sep 23, 2009
    Missouri
    Do you understand a punnet square?


    Hate to admit it but not really. [​IMG] I am thinking of buying some lavs or split lavs and I already own BB and was just wondering for arguments sake what would happen if they mixed and also how to breed starting with splits to create lavs that breed true.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Check out http://www.edelras.nl/chickengenetics/theory.html#gen_theory_punnett

    Basically
    , each parent contributes one of each gene (excluding sex-linked genes) to each offspring. If the parent is pure, or homozygous, for an allele (the specific variation of a gene), it will always pass that allele to its offspring. However, if it has two different alleles of a gene, about half the time it will provdine one, and about half the time it will provide the other. A punnet square is a way of visually depicting the possible alleles that can be inherited from a particular set of parents. Since each parent has two genes, and htere are two parents, there are 4 possible outcomes, each representing a 25% chance of inheriting that pair of alleles. In presenting percentages, the squares that have the same outcome (if there are any) are combined to make 50% or 100% as appropriate.

    Anyways, to answer the question of what would a lavender bred to a blue or black or splash produce, all offspring would receive a copy of lav (or be split to lav), but none would display that phenotype (appearance). A splash bird bred to a bird who does not carry blue will give all offspring who are blue ; one bred to a blue will give about half the offspring who are splash, the other half who are blue. Generally it is thought to be a poor idea to breed lavender to blue.
     

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