Can you eat roosters?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Rocket Angel, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. Rocket Angel

    Rocket Angel New Egg

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    Just curious, does anyone eat roosters? Are they suitable as a food source, and if not what do I do when i have too many? Thank you ~ Christa
     
  2. cassie

    cassie Overrun With Chickens

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    Of course you can eat roosters. That is what people do with them. If they are young, you can fry or roast them. If they have a little age on them you make soup, or chicken and dumplings, or put them in the crock pot.
     
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  3. wekiva bird

    wekiva bird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x2
     
  4. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Overrun With Chickens

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    The only difference between rooster and roaster is a single vowel. [​IMG]
     
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  5. melz

    melz New Egg

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    Hi,
    Thinking about killing and eating some of my roosters. I have ended up with quite a few after the last hatch. Just curious whether this a common practice in general or do most people avoid eating rooster? Also what age would you recommend for this they are currently 14 weeks give or take. Your advice would be appreciated. Melz
     
  6. phalenbeck

    phalenbeck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mine are about the same age, and I am waiting for them to get a bit bigger, or beccome a problem. At ths point they are kind of small.
     
  7. Elke Beck

    Elke Beck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For dual purpose roosters I aim for at least 16 weeks. They are pretty scrawny until then. I keep feeling their breast and legs (yes, yes, I feel like a pervert doing it), and wait until they have a nice layer of meat on their breasts.
     
  8. melz

    melz New Egg

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    Thanks for the reply. When you say dual purpose does that mean certain breeds are eatable and others aren't. Sorry I'm very new at this. Haha funny ya perve ;)
     
  9. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Overrun With Chickens

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    Dual purpose just means they are good for both meat and eggs. Some breeds are great egg producers, but thin on the meat, others are very meaty but don't lay a lot of eggs, so those aren't "dual purpose".
    All are edible.
     
  10. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I shoot for 6 months. ANd I have sent a few older roosters which are definitly a little meatier. S lower temp and longer is better for roasting. I raost everything, even if it is going into a soup = gotta have good flaver in the soup!

    THere would be far too many roosters if they didn't end up in the soup pot, as it were. We have our favs as pets though.

    Dual purpose-- most breeds are dual purpose; most of the old breeds have not been kept up on the meat capacity unfortunately. THe hatchery bred are likely to be mega egg producers-- mine certainly are. My speckled sussex produce an egg a day, far more than the 3-4 per week that is traditional.

    SO you need to know the characteristics of the line.
     

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