Can you force a chicken into broodiness?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Allie Grace Sanders, Mar 17, 2019.

  1. Allie Grace Sanders

    Allie Grace Sanders Songster

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    I have two BO's in my flock, who are 1 year old. I have ten or eleven plastic easter eggs that are weighted in 1 nest box. I heard that you can put a hen in a nest with eggs and cover her with a bucket, while I was reading a book. Has anyone here tried this? If so, did it work? I just need to add to my flock quickly, the numbers are dwindling.:hit:(
     
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Can you direct us to the book? I would not use real eggs during the induction process, rather add those once broodiness commences.
     
  3. Allie Grace Sanders

    Allie Grace Sanders Songster

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    It was a historical-fiction book called Hattie Big Sky. It mentioned that she forced her hen by putting a bucket over her.
     
  4. A_Fowl_Guy

    A_Fowl_Guy Wildlife Biologist

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    You can encourage broodiness by leaving artificial eggs in the nest box but you cannot force a hen into broodiness.
     
  5. WunnySharbit

    WunnySharbit Chirping

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    My chix knew that the plastic eggs were fake and refused to go near them, let alone sit on them. I would think you'd be better off letting them tell you where they want to lay and set.

    Also: I have had many, many chix over the years and have only had a handful go broody. Yours may not want to raise kids....
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    I do not like the fiction part but will try to find book. I can "force broodines" in roosters so maybe it can be done with hens.
     
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  7. Perris

    Perris Songster

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    how? :confused:
     
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    First look at following thread to see how it sets up naturally. The broody rooster would not incubate eggs, rather his investment is better suited for post hatch care. Breed may be important, those I use are American Game. @Perris the game roosters still in UK might do similar with little trouble.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/what-to-look-for-in-a-broody-rooster.882368/

    My forcing efforts are not intentional, rather the rooster is used to protect broods and prevent siblicide. Usually the chicks are at least 2 weeks post-hatch. A fully mature rooster is put in a pen with one to as many as 20 chicks. I can tell in a glance if he is up to the task. Rooster and chicks will begin imprinting on each other almost immediately. If chicks too scared, then I put rooster in a smaller pen they can get in and out of. Then add quality eats to rooster's pen so he can tid bit call them in and let them eat. Will take a couple days but association with get strong enough chicks will roost under him and he will allow it and sometimes even call them up.
     
  9. adstowe

    adstowe Songster

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    Trying to obtain valid information from a fictional book is not likely to go well. You say your numbers are dwindling. Why are they dwindling? Old age? Predators? If it's caused by something other than old age, then this needs to be addressed first. As far as making a hen go broody? Good luck. Your best bet is to get a heat source and a suitable brooding container and buy some chicks. You can wish/hope/try for a broody hen and still end up never having one.
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Bunk.
     
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