Can you incubate at 95 degrees 60% humidity?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by dandydoodle, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. dandydoodle

    dandydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2010
    georgia
    Can you incubate at 95degrees and 60 percent humidity? My first time and having a little trouble getting incubator to go to 90 degrees and 50% humidity.
    thanks
     
  2. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    I thought you were exposed to incubate the eggs at 99.5 degrees
     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
    NO, the temp is not high enough for the embryo to grow and thrive. It will start and grow slowly according to one source I've read; but it not the optimal temperature for success. Use 99-100 degrees for forced air incubation.

    Hunidity is only important to have the air cell increase in size slowly during the incubation time.


    Maybe this would help:
    http://sp.uconn.edu/~mdarre/4-hpoultry/helpfulhints.html

    Also be sure to read the sticky at the top of the incubation section; load of helpful info there.
     
  4. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Quote:Yeah, that's what I thought too.
     
  5. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    That high of humidity for the entire hatch will drown the embyro. But then again, it won't develop all the way because those temperatures are FAR too low. I mean, +/- a degree or two isn't best, but the embryos still hatch either early or late. Being off by nearly five degrees? Not gonna happen.
     
  6. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Massachusetts, USA
    Find Chookschick's page on dry incubating. This really means using what moisture is necessary to have the air cells increase properly. If you are in the desert you need to add water for sure; if the ambient humidy is already 60 % , you might need AC. Am I clear as mud? It's all about the air cell developing at the proper rate. Try looking at this; look for the second egg diagram one for chickens.

    http://www.poultryconnection.com/quackers/aircell.html
     
  7. dandydoodle

    dandydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2010
    georgia
    Thanks, I know the heat is suppose to be 99.5 degrees and the humidity is suppose to be 50 degrees. I have never incubated before. I just got a knew hova bator and I keep turning it up but, I was having trouble getting it to go past 95 degrees. I think it might have finally gone up. OKay about the humidity I have bought two different hygrometers this week one says 47 and the other says 60. That is a big difference so I don't know what to do.[​IMG] Is there a range it can be between and have everything go well? No one worry I haven't actually put any babies in yet, I am trying to get this machine figured out before putting anyone at risk. [​IMG] Even my cheap tryout eggs that I am not sure is fertilized. [​IMG] Any advice on the humidity would be greatly appreciated. Am I gonna have to buy a 3rd hygrometer just to find out which is right?
     
  8. dandydoodle

    dandydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2010
    georgia
    Oh yea, thanks for the site I will check it out in the morning. [​IMG]
     
  9. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    you don't need a third hygrometer.. just calibrate the ones you currently have.. are they adjustable?

    you can use the salt method to do that easily enough
     
  10. georgia531

    georgia531 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought a new hovabator as well a few weeks ago, and was having trouble getting it to heat up... turns out the heat circle thing needed tightened on the underside of the lid... you have to open the bator, hold the heat circle thing and twist the wing nut.. i was turning but the circle needed to be tighter on the screw, and the wing nut was not holding it still to tighten, takes a second to fix. .. hope this helps.

    Quote:
     

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