1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Can you make a hen go broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by epeloquin, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. epeloquin

    epeloquin Chillin' With My Peeps

    627
    13
    141
    Mar 11, 2011
    Western Massachusetts
    I want to add a couple of new hens to my flock but I do not want to go through the process of buying new pullets or laying hens, quarantine and then hope they will integrate well. I added two hens that way before but ended up having to re-home one of them. The new owner of that hen (Buff Orp) slipped a chick under her bum when she went broody and she took to it famously.

    I know Buff Orps go broody easily. I have 2 Rhodies, 2 Plymouth Rocks and one Minorca. I would love it if one of them went broody so I could give her a couple chicks. Unfortunately I originally got the Rocks and Rhodies because they don't go broody very often. They are two years old and have never gone broody.

    I am would love some ideas.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    450
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    The usual wisdom is, no, they will go broody if their hormones tell them to, otherwise not. I have read a few times of an "old fashioned" method to make a broody by confining a hen for a few days on a darkened nest on fake eggs, but I have yet to read of someone trying this, much less succeeding. On the other hand, many people slip chicks under broodies with success, especially if they are day old chicks, or no more than 2-3 days. I've done this myself.

    Old English Games, Kraienkoppes, Malays, Shamos, Asils, Madagascar Games, Silkies, and some strains of Dorking are the ones most likely to go broody, particularly Old English Games which I understand are almost 100%.. Cochins and Orpingtons are among those "somewhat" likely to do so. On the other hand, a broody of most any breed will occasionally pop up.
     
  3. imogene08

    imogene08 Chillin' With My Peeps

    448
    5
    91
    May 12, 2013
    Florida
    C
    The usual wisdom is, no, they will go broody if their hormones tell them to, otherwise not.  I have read a few times of an "old fashioned" method to make a broody by confining a hen for a few days on a darkened nest on fake eggs, but I have yet to read of someone trying this, much less succeeding.  On the other hand, many people slip chicks under broodies with success, especially if they are day old chicks, or no more than 2-3 days.  I've done this myself.

    Old English Games, Kraienkoppes, Malays, Shamos, Asils, Madagascar Games, Silkies, and some strains of Dorking are the ones most likely to go broody, particularly Old English Games which I understand are almost 100%..  Cochins and Orpingtons are among those "somewhat" likely to do so.  On the other hand, a broody of most any breed will occasionally pop up.
    [/quote
    X2
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

    31,452
    3,522
    538
    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    If you want a potentially broody hen, you're going to have to get another bird. If they haven't gone broody in 2 years, they pretty much ain't gonna. Hatchery birds have been bred to take the broodiness out, and you can't put that back. They just lack the maternal hormones.

    You'll also need a plan for the 50% roosters you'll hatch out.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by