Can you tell me what breed these chicks are? and take a guess on gender?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by ProjectChick, Sep 13, 2014.

  1. ProjectChick

    ProjectChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chicks are 4 weeks old now and I have kind of guessed at the gender of each. I was wondering what all of you thought?

    What I would really like to know is what breed you all think they are?

    Pictures are not perfect but they do pose pretty well.




    Side and Face view chick 1
    [​IMG][​IMG]





    Side and Face view chick 2
    [​IMG][​IMG]




    Side and Face view chick 3
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    Thank so much for all your help and knowledge out there is chicken land!
     
  2. secretevo

    secretevo Out Of The Brooder

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    They look just like my Red Pyle Old English Bantom babies that we had the spring.
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm thinking that the first two are Red Sex-Link females and the third is a Red Sex-Link male.
     
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    First two are Red Sex-link pullets. Last one is a cockerel, and probably also a Red Sex-link.
     
  5. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree. 2 RSL females and 1 RSL male. Red Sex Links are egg laying machines. :eek:)
     
  6. ProjectChick

    ProjectChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Red Sex Link is what we have been leaning towards for the 1 and 2, but we were leaning towards male on number 1? Their wing feathers were different as new chicks.

    We didn't know what to think of number 3. That one was the tiniest when we brought them home and wing feathers looked just link number 2. So we assumed those two were females. Although it was lighter color even as a new chick. But number three is definitely bigger than the others now and looks nothing like the others in coloring or features. It is all white\ivory. We are definitely thinking male on that one now, but was assuming he was a different breed?

    But we are completely new at this. So we maybe completely surprised.
     
  7. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Assuming that it's a Red Sex Link (we are certainly not infallible), # 1 is a female. Male chicks hatch out white and remain that way (like # 3) until they start to mature at which point they typically start to develop some reddish feathers in the saddle area.
     
  8. ProjectChick

    ProjectChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is good news! Let's hope for Red Sex Link! Although, we will have to change #1's name. We have been calling him Cog (short for Cogburn). But that will be a happy change.

    We have all ready changed #3 from Shelly, to Sheldon. :)
     
  9. toby8429

    toby8429 Out Of The Brooder

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    My guess is golden comets
     
  10. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Golden Comets are Red Sex Links. Golden Comet is one of many labels under which some hatcheries market their Red Sex Links, which are produced by crossing a red gene roo (RIR, NHR, or Production Red) with a silver gene hen (WR, RIW, SLW, Delawares, or Light Sussex). Other labels under which hatcheries market their Red Sex Links are Red Star, Brown Sex Link, Gold Sex Link, Cinnamon Queen, Golden Buff, Bovans Brown, Hubbard Golden Comet, Isa Brown, Shaver Brown, Babcock Brown, Warrens, HyLines, Gold Lines, Lohmans, Lohmans Brown, ect., but no matter what label they are marketed under, RSLs are egg laying machines, outlaying either parent breed. It's one of the interesting quirks of hybridization.
     

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