candling question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by adorable, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    The eggs are 6 days old in the incubator. I put in about 2 dozen out of the fridge and about 7 from the nest. The ones that was in the fridge was in there for about 3 weeks.I let them warm up at room temperature for about 6 hours. Then i put all of them in the incubator. Well tonight i candled them. Thinking i would only have the 7 from the nest. I have about 20 good ones so far. I was shocked. But my question is some seams to be more developed then others. Is it because some might of died?. Or is it because it took the cooler ones a little more behind because it took them a little longer to warm up?. THis is the first time i ever took eggs out of the fridge to incubate.
     
  2. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm

    The fridge eggs should be a little behind the fresh ones if they went strait in the incubator but it should be less than 6 hours behind. But you warmed them up so they should be about the same. The fridge eggs may be weaker than the fresh ones?
     
  3. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    near ottawa ontario
    what do you mean the fridge ones will be weaker than the fresh ones?.I put all the eggs in the bator all at the same time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
  4. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    Well, if you stored the refrigerated eggs for 3 weeks before putting them in the 'bator, they may not be as viable as the fresh eggs. Three weeks is a long time to wait before putting them in, refrigerated or not. Also, depending on your hatching experience, incubator, turning methods, and candler... 6 days is a little early to determine whether certain embryos are more developed than others.
    Try waiting several more days, then candle again.
     
  5. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm

    There 3 weeks old. The fact that there growing at all is interesting. What goes wrong in old eggs I dont know but but I expect them to be weaker an have less grow to term.
     
  6. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
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    when you put eggs in the fridge it keeps them longer.If you have them sitting on the counter for 3 weeks waiting. To me they are more advance for spoiling. I guess i will have to wait and see what happens. [​IMG]
     
  7. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm

    Yes any egg on the counter longer than about 2 weeks starts loosing viability. Refrigerating egg you need to keep for more than 2 weeks will give you a better hatchrate than if you left them on the counter but you should expect 50% or less by 3 weeks in an get worse as they get older. Do not refrigerated eggs that are not going to be kept over 2 weeks. It will hurt there hatch rates.
     
  8. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    For eating purposes, refrigerated eggs keep longer.
    For hatching purposes, room temp is good enough. I've heard that extended refrigeration causes hatch rates to drop.
    Regardless of where they were stored, 3 weeks is 3 weeks... the longer they are kept before incubation is started, the lower the hatch rate will be.
    As for spoiling... as long as the egg is clean and intact, spoiling shouldn't be a problem.
    I have left peafowl eggs in the 'bator for 32 days (gestation for peafowl is 28 days) and cracked them open to determine why they didn't hatch. The eggs that were infertile were not spoiled and seemed just like fresh eggs. The yolk membrane was a little weak, but they certainly didn't spoil. That was after 32 days at about 100 degrees.
    Here is where I got my info: http://gallus.tamu.edu/Extension%20publications/b6092.pdf
    Storage time—Ideally, eggs should be set in the incubator as soon after gathering as possible to maintain egg quality. If eggs are to be stored before incubation, the best hatchability occurs when eggs are stored for less than 7 days from the time they were laid. However, some species are more sensitive to storage than other species. Hatchability decreases rapidly in eggs held in storage for
    more than 10 days. Storing eggs longer than 2 weeks also can extend the normal incubation time as much as 1 day.

    Temperature and humidity during storage—Fertile eggs should be stored at a dry bulb, normal temperature between 55 degrees F and 65 degrees F, or 13 degrees C and 18 degrees C. Embryos will begin to develop abnormally, weaken and die if the temperature is too high. A low temperature also causes high embryo mortality. Storage temperature should never exceed 72 degrees F (22 degrees C) and never go below 46 degrees F (8 degrees C). Egg storage at room temperature or at normal refrigerator temperatures (32 degrees F to 40 degrees F) is not acceptable because hatchability decreases.

    Good luck with your hatch.​
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
  9. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    thanks.I will know for next time.
     

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