Canned black beans

Kayla's Lunch

Songster
Jun 9, 2018
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Maryland
I wanted to give my girls some treats since they are molting. Can I feed black beans straight from the can. I read something that said the beans are only partially cooked. Is that true? I thought anything canned was thoroughly cooked. Thanks1
 

Kayla's Lunch

Songster
Jun 9, 2018
493
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Maryland
Their main diet is New Country Organics, which I ferment. I also grow barley fodder and they free range part of the day in a weed filled very unmanicured yard.
 
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Red-Stars-in-RI

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 24, 2014
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Rhode Island
I wanted to give my girls some treats since they are molting. Can I feed black beans straight from the can. I read something that said the beans are only partially cooked. Is that true? I thought anything canned was thoroughly cooked. Thanks1

You'll want to take them out of the can first (chickens lack the thumbs to work a can opener) :D but otherwise, I've fed leftover black beans to my flock before with no issues...they seem to love 'em!
 

Kayla's Lunch

Songster
Jun 9, 2018
493
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Maryland
You'll want to take them out of the can first (chickens lack the thumbs to work a can opener) :D but otherwise, I've fed leftover black beans to my flock before with no issues...they seem to love 'em!

Red Stars! OMG! Thanks for telling me! Is that why their bag of chicken feed is still laying in the run? Was I supposed to open that too? Darn chickens - so helpless!
 

Chickassan

Wattle Fondler
May 23, 2017
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Phytohaemagglutnin (Kidney Bean Lectin)
This toxic agent is found in many species of beans, but it is in highest concentration in red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). The unit of toxin measure is the hemagglutinating unit (hau). Raw kidney beans contain from 20,000 to 70,000 hau, while fully cooked beans contain from 200 to 400 hau. White kidney beans, another variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, contain about one-third the amount of toxin as the red variety; broad beans (Vicia faba) contain 5 to 10% the amount that red kidney beans contain.
redkidney-200.jpg
As few as 4 or 5 beans can bring on symptoms. Onset of symptoms varies from between 1 to 3 hours. Onset is usually marked by extreme nausea, followed by vomiting, which may be very severe. Diarrhea develops somewhat later (from one to a few hours), and some persons report abdominal pain. Some persons have been hospitalized, but recovery is usually rapid (3 - 4 h after onset of symptoms) and spontaneous.

The syndrome is usually caused by the ingestion of raw, soaked kidney beans, either alone or in salads or casseroles. As few as four or five raw beans can trigger symptoms. Several outbreaks have been associated with "slow cookers" or crock pots, or in casseroles which had not reached a high enough internal temperature to destroy the glycoprotein lectin. It has been shown that heating to 80 degrees C. may potentiate the toxicity five-fold, so that these beans are more toxic than if eaten raw. In studies of casseroles cooked in slow cookers, internal temperatures often did not exceed 75 degrees C.

All persons, regardless of age or gender, appear to be equally susceptible; the severity is related only to the dose ingested.
This is the science behind no kidney beans.
Even cooked to smoosh enough isn't removed to make them o.k for chickens.:)
Interesting...what is it about the red kidney bean that makes it a no-no? I hadn't heard that before!
 

Suedan

Songster
Sep 18, 2019
340
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Maryland
Phytohaemagglutnin (Kidney Bean Lectin)
This toxic agent is found in many species of beans, but it is in highest concentration in red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). The unit of toxin measure is the hemagglutinating unit (hau). Raw kidney beans contain from 20,000 to 70,000 hau, while fully cooked beans contain from 200 to 400 hau. White kidney beans, another variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, contain about one-third the amount of toxin as the red variety; broad beans (Vicia faba) contain 5 to 10% the amount that red kidney beans contain.
redkidney-200.jpg
As few as 4 or 5 beans can bring on symptoms. Onset of symptoms varies from between 1 to 3 hours. Onset is usually marked by extreme nausea, followed by vomiting, which may be very severe. Diarrhea develops somewhat later (from one to a few hours), and some persons report abdominal pain. Some persons have been hospitalized, but recovery is usually rapid (3 - 4 h after onset of symptoms) and spontaneous.

The syndrome is usually caused by the ingestion of raw, soaked kidney beans, either alone or in salads or casseroles. As few as four or five raw beans can trigger symptoms. Several outbreaks have been associated with "slow cookers" or crock pots, or in casseroles which had not reached a high enough internal temperature to destroy the glycoprotein lectin. It has been shown that heating to 80 degrees C. may potentiate the toxicity five-fold, so that these beans are more toxic than if eaten raw. In studies of casseroles cooked in slow cookers, internal temperatures often did not exceed 75 degrees C.

All persons, regardless of age or gender, appear to be equally susceptible; the severity is related only to the dose ingested.
This is the science behind no kidney beans.
Even cooked to smoosh enough isn't removed to make them o.k for chickens.:)
Cool beans, lol! Now we know.
 

MANNA-PRO

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