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canned cat food help

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by mom'sfolly, Dec 12, 2009.

  1. mom'sfolly

    mom'sfolly Overrun With Chickens

    5,024
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    Feb 15, 2007
    Austin area, Texas
    My vet just told me to switch the kitties to canned food. I hate the stinky stuff, but the cats seem to love it. My problem is that the vet's suggested website for cat food analysis has disappeared. I've been reading labels, but the print is small, and the labels confusing...a real analysis would help. The vet says meat, with very little grain, soy or veggies it the ticket, and that chicken and fish are better than beef. But the labels say things like fish, poultry by-products, liver, brewer's rice, and some have artifical flavors and colors and all kinds of preservatives. It's so confusing. So what do y'all feed your cats, and do you have any sites that could help me?

    If you have switched or you make your own cat food, can you tell me your results?

    Elise and Katie Cat say thank you.......
     
  2. lorieMN

    lorieMN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2008
    montevideo,MN
    mom'sfolly :

    My vet just told me to switch the kitties to canned food. I hate the stinky stuff, but the cats seem to love it. My problem is that the vet's suggested website for cat food analysis has disappeared. I've been reading labels, but the print is small, and the labels confusing...a real analysis would help. The vet says meat, with very little grain, soy or veggies it the ticket, and that chicken and fish are better than beef. But the labels say things like fish, poultry by-products, liver, brewer's rice, and some have artifical flavors and colors and all kinds of preservatives. It's so confusing. So what do y'all feed your cats, and do you have any sites that could help me?

    If you have switched or you make your own cat food, can you tell me your results?

    Elise and Katie Cat say thank you.......

    cats are 100% carnivores,you can feed them raw meat/bones/organs and they will do wonderfully.wont cost anymore then premium cans.​
     
  3. Crazyland

    Crazyland Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 14, 2009
    Sandhills NC
    There are several other companies like Taste Of the Wild that makes a canned cat food. Also Wellness, Merrick, Before grains, Evo, Halo, Wysong, Sold Gold, Innova, Felidae (same brand as Canidae)... and more I can't think of.

    But why switch to canned from dry? The dry help to scrape the teeth while the canned leads to dental decay, and or lots of fights when you try to brush their teeth.

    Look on www.petfooddirect.com for a good list of companies to choose from. They do sell junk foods as people still buy junk. But it is a one stop place to look at foods and not have to search many individual websites.

    Also as mentioned you could go raw with them. Since cats eat very little it is very cheap to feed a raw diet to them.
     
  4. mom'sfolly

    mom'sfolly Overrun With Chickens

    5,024
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    Feb 15, 2007
    Austin area, Texas
    Both cats are indoor only and somewhat overweight. Evidently with cats as obligatory carnivores, the plant material as excess carbs in kibble contributes to weight gain. They will still get some kibble, but I do worry about the tooth stuff. Even with our now gone 19 year old kitty, she never needed teeth cleaning, and she was a lifelong kibble eater. She did have skin issue, and that may have been diet related.

    The vet said chicken and fish were better than beef. Next time I will ask her about feeding raw, or making my own cat food. I think I could do it cheaper than canned cat food. I'd just make a bunch and freeze it in 4 oz ziplocs.
     
  5. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    Everything listed by Crazyland is what I alternate feeding my cats, now they are eating California Natural, they have venison, lamb, beef and chicken flavors
     
  6. dragonchick

    dragonchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 30, 2007
  7. thebritt

    thebritt Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 5, 2009
    Humboldt County
    Canned cat food is around 70% water. Seems weird that your vet would recommend a switch to only wet food. As mentioned, crunchies help scrape off tarter and slimy gack from their teeth. When you can, look at their teeth and see if they look crusty/slimy/tartery(not a word, I know). Compare the labels - per serving - of quality crunchies vs quality wet food. Making your own food can be a good idea, but be SURE you have a source of taurine in your mix. Not sure where that comes from (it's not from fish), but if it's not in the food, blindness is the result. Good luck!
     
  8. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    General Description

    Taurine is a supplement that is mainly used to treat panic disorders or anxiety attacks. However it is also used as a weight loss aid. It supports the function of white blood cells, the heart, the skeletal system and the brain. It is available in pill form.

    In recent years, taurine has become a common ingredient in energy drinks. Taurine is not an "upper" and has no known stimulatory effect on the body. It is unclear why taurine is added to energy drinks but the inhibitory effect on neurotransmission might reduce the jittery effect of high amounts of caffeine that are found in this drink. Taurine has also been known to improve mental focus in some individuals but no conclusive studies have been done on Taurine.

    Technically, Taurine or 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid as it is scientifically known is an organic acid that is abundant in the tissues of many animals. Taurine is also found in smaller amounts in the tissues plants, fungi, and some bacterial species. Taurine is a derivative of the sulphur-containing (sulfhydryl) amino acid, cysteine.

    Taurine is named after the Latin word for bull, which is Taurus. This is because the semi-amino acid was first isolated from bull bile in 1827. It is often called an amino acid, even in scientific literature, but it lacks a carboxyl group and therefore does not qualify scientifically to be called an amino acid

    Sources of the Supplement

    A modern urban legend says that Taurine is made from bull semen. In fact, Taurine is synthesized in a laboratory through a combination of cysteine, methionine and vitamin E.


    The cheapest and most abundant sources of Taurine are found in energy drinks. It is found in Red Bull, Sparks, Spykes, SoBe Power Fruit Rush, SoBe Adrenaline Rush, Monster, Extra Joss and Coca Cola’s energy drink - Rockstar. Rockstar, depending on the flavor can contain as much as 2000 mg of Taurine. A Korean vitamin supplement drink called "MegaVita 1666" contains 2380mg of Taurine in an 8.05 oz. A more reasonable dosage of 25 mg is found in Power C Vitamin Water and in Glaceau Vitamin Water.


    Natural sources of taurine are eggs, meats, dairy products and fish proteins.

    General Description

    Taurine is a supplement that is mainly used to treat panic disorders or anxiety attacks. However it is also used as a weight loss aid. It supports the function of white blood cells, the heart, the skeletal system and the brain. It is available in pill form.



    In recent years, taurine has become a common ingredient in energy drinks. Taurine is not an "upper" and has no known stimulatory effect on the body. It is unclear why taurine is added to energy drinks but the inhibitory effect on neurotransmission might reduce the jittery effect of high amounts of caffeine that are found in this drink. Taurine has also been known to improve mental focus in some individuals but no conclusive studies have been done on Taurine.



    Technically, Taurine or 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid as it is scientifically known is an organic acid that is abundant in the tissues of many animals. Taurine is also found in smaller amounts in the tissues plants, fungi, and some bacterial species. Taurine is a derivative of the sulphur-containing (sulfhydryl) amino acid, cysteine.



    Taurine is named after the Latin word for bull, which is Taurus. This is because the semi-amino acid was first isolated from bull bile in 1827. It is often called an amino acid, even in scientific literature, but it lacks a carboxyl group and therefore does not qualify scientifically to be called an amino acid

    Sources of the Supplement

    A modern urban legend says that Taurine is made from bull semen. In fact, Taurine is synthesized in a laboratory through a combination of cysteine, methionine and vitamin E.

    The cheapest and most abundant sources of Taurine are found in energy drinks. It is found in Red Bull, Sparks, Spykes, SoBe Power Fruit Rush, SoBe Adrenaline Rush, Monster, Extra Joss and Coca Cola’s energy drink - Rockstar. Rockstar, depending on the flavor can contain as much as 2000 mg of Taurine. A Korean vitamin supplement drink called "MegaVita 1666" contains 2380mg of Taurine in an 8.05 oz. A more reasonable dosage of 25 mg is found in Power C Vitamin Water and in Glaceau Vitamin Water.



    Natural sources of taurine are eggs, meats, dairy products and fish proteins.

    http://en.allexperts.com/q/Cat-Food-3490/taurine.htm :

    Question
    How much taurine does a cat need daily to remain healthy? I have found contradictory information online. Since the catfood recall, I am feeding my kitties cooked dark turkey and dark chicken meat and canned clams as sources of taurine, but wonder if I need to add a supplement.

    Answer
    Hi Jane,

    Dark poultry meat, such as turkey and chicken contain high amounts of taurine, so you're on the right track. Cooking depletes the amount of bio-available nutrients and taurine content, as well as helpful enzymes that aid in digestion. I would offer the meat raw or very gently seared. For some cats who do not like it raw, it is sometimes simply a matter of warming it up a bit for them to accept it. I put the meat in a zip lock bag and let it sit in a bowl of hot water for a couple minutes and then serve it to the cat immediately.

    Here is the most sound source of information, in regards to taurine that I have found thus far:
    http://www.serve.com/BatonRouge/taurine_chmr.htm

    I believe that this is one area of research that needs more attention. The "ideal" feline diet is one that is comparable to her natural feeding tendances. Meaning, that whatever she is fed should be modeled after the prey based diet that she would be eating naturally.
    This is where it becomes challenging to provide precise numbers, because the taurine analysis of whole prey (rodents, small birds, etc) is unavailable, so far unpublished, as far as I am aware.

    Here is some interesting information from the website I provided above:

    "There's always the question how much taurine may be present in a whole mouse carcass since it is a natural prey of cats. So far, I was not able to find any scientific source to verify data. C.J. Puotinen claims that a typical mouse will contain 2.4 mg/g taurine or (for better comparison with the other values: 100 g would contain 240mg or 1 kg of mouse carcass would raise these values up to 2400 mg). Unfortunately, he does not indicate his source of reference. The same values have been published in Small Animal Clinical Nutrition, 4th Edition, various contributors, published 2000 by Mark Morris Institute. Well, actually they say that the taurine content of mouse carcass is 7000mg/kg but on a dry matter basis. Since mice are 60-65 water the conversion will bring it down to the values Puotinen published. Again, no source of reference. If these values are correct then - compared to Laidlows findings - dark turkey meat sure would meet the values of an equal amount of mouse carcass or even exceed it."

    With the dark poultry meat you're providing, I would not be worried about the lack of taurine.

    However, since you didn't mention it, I do wonder if you are providing a calcium source, and other supplemental nutrients? It really is not difficult to prepare your own balanced diet. Again, simply look at natures model for guidance. For instance, a whole prey animal will offer a cat roughly the following:

    10-15% edible bones
    10% organs (1/5 of this being liver)
    75-80% meat, skin, fat, connective tissues, and other "by-products"

    The bulk of the diet is "meat," so you are on the right track. Just be sure that you are providing the other necessary elements as well. The average adult cat needs only about 8oz of liver per month, 8oz of other mixed organs, and about 1 -1.5lbs of bone per month. Really, these amounts are not that substantial, but they are very important in creating a balanced diet.

    Here is a great nutritional guideline, written by Dr. Tom Lonsdale:
    http://www.rawmeatybones.com/diet/exp-diet-guide.pdf

    Feel free to have me clarify anything that doesn't make sense to you, if you have any questions.

    Best regards,
    Michelle
    http://www.usrmb.net/
     
  9. write2caroline

    write2caroline Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,156
    52
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    Jun 21, 2009
    Jacksonville
    I knew a vet once who sofened the dry food with water in a fridge - house sat for him - for the record it was simply purina the one that looks like an x. He had a system of 4 bowls with lids and I had to add food and water and place it on the bottom and feed from the covered bowl on top so the food had 4 days to soak in the fridge. When I give my kitties soft food they love the trout and other fish flavors from I can't think of the name - small can name brand - they refuse to eat the generic version of the same - little friskies I think.

    Caroline
    Jax FL
     

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