1. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I'm posting this because I lost a little hen to enteritis caused by capillaria worms and the damage allowed a cocci infection in. I worm regularly, but I've learned that capillaria need more than just the single usual worming because they are tougher. They are supposedly carried by round worms and she had 1 roundworm in her intestine as well. It really shocked me because she's been in a pen for 4 years (silkie) so where did the worm come from? It must have been painful, she was disoriented on the end.

    I tend to think that this could have been avoided by doing a worming method specifically for capillaria and anything else, or a proper worming with 2 doses 10 days apart . I guess 1 worming of safeguard every few months didn't cut it.

    My free range flock is worm free .

    I wonder if there's anything that can also be done to the ground in the pens?
     
  2. mrsc1951

    mrsc1951 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So sorry for your loss! [​IMG] I have wondered the same thing about treating the soil without killing off the bugs they like to eat. I always thought (mistakenly, I guess) that the sandy soil here was less hospitable to some of the worms. It does seem to me that I read somewhere that the first dose(s) of safeguard should be 3 days in a row, then 1 dose 10 days later.
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Can't comment on the ground, but I can tell you that capillary worms are what many peafowl people lose their peafowl to. Dosing recomendations seem to vary depending on what literature one reads, but I use Safeguard for five days at 0.5ml per 2.2 pounds. There is someone on the peafowl forum that just went through some worming issues and his vet told him to use the same amount I use, so I feel pretty confident on that. This is what we came up with for worming peafowl:

    Peafowl Amount (1 ml = 1 cc)
    Large Adult Male 3 ml
    Small Adult Male 2 ml
    Large Adult Female 2 ml
    Small Adult Female 1.5 ml
    Large 3 month old chick 1 ml
    Medium 3 month old chick 0.8 ml
    Small 3 month old chick 0.7 ml
    Above doses are for liquid *or* paste.

    -Kathy
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Capillary worms are a type of roundworm, they are not carried by large roundworms or any other worms. Worming once a day for 5 days straight will take care of capillary worms and other types of worms except tapeworms when safeguard liquid goat wormer is used. There is no need to reworm 10 days later. Since the soil will be loaded with worm eggs; rotate pens or pasture, worm frequently. Sand helps deterring insects that may carry worm eggs.
    Worm eggs are in the soil everywhere. Check out lifecycles for worms in chickens.
     
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  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I thought this study was interesting:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/6868306/?i=5&from=/6743169/related
    Efficacy of fenbendazole against nematodes of captive birds.

    Authors

    Lawrence K.
    Journal

    Vet Rec. 1983 Apr 30;112(18):433-4.
    Affiliation
    Abstract


    Fenbendazole was used to treat nematode infestations (Ascaridia species and Capillaria species) in 230 birds of six orders and 38 different species. Using a single dose of 100 mg/kg bodyweight initial treatment eliminated parasitic nematodes from 221 birds. A further course of treatment at a dose rate of 30 mg/kg daily for seven days eliminated the infestation from the remaining nine birds.

    -Kathy
     
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  6. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I thought the same about the sand. I swear when we moved in there were no worms in this barren beach sand. However, I guess birds, rodents, and chicken poo attracts them?

    I am hoping that some read this thread and do a 5 day safeguard worming.
    How about with Valbazen?

    I was reading about this wormer that's very popular in GB, and wondering how to get it, turns out to be the same as Valbazen!
     
  7. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I always called them gong worms or hair worms. Capillaria annulata and Capillaria contorta occur in the crop and esophagus. These may cause thickening and inflammation of the mucosa, and occasionally severe losses. I wouldn't be surprised if some of the crop issues reported in this section of the forum were due to capillary worms. Here's a wealth of information on these vile parasites, and the effective anthelmintics to use:
    http://parasitipedia.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2649&Itemid=2938
     
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  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Absolutely correct Michael. I would bet capillary worms ARE the cause of a lot of crop problems in this forum. Another sign of capillary worm crop infection is that birds will pull their head and neck in close to their breast.
     
  9. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Would the same 5 day regiment be required with Albendazole too? I've done 3 day frequencies before, but tend to be a bit overly cautious. For instance, Trifen Avicola (Albendazole) directs dosage two 70 mg tabs 3 days in a row for large hens.
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Not with valbazen (albendazole.) It stays in the system slowly killing worms over a period of about 3-5 days. This is why I recommend valbazen as a first time wormer. There's no chance of toxic dead worm overload, not like other wormers when there's a massive worm kill off. When dealing with tapeworms though, I always recommend 24 hour withholding of feed, increased dosage, and dosing once every 4th or 5th day at three intervals.
    ReguIar worming with valbazen; I do an initial worming, then reworm again 10 days later.
     
    1 person likes this.

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