Caponing question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by songbird, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. songbird

    songbird Out Of The Brooder

    97
    1
    41
    Feb 16, 2009
    New England
    Hi all,
    I'm a newbie to the chicken world, and am trying to plan our launch into this adventure this spring. Can anyone tell me about caponing, and whether this will change a rooster's behavior? I have 5 little kids (under 6 years) and I can't have a grumpy rooster around. I'd order sexed chicks but many I've noticed only come in straight run.
    Thanks!
     
  2. illinichick

    illinichick Chillin' With My Peeps

    311
    0
    139
    Mar 31, 2008
    SE Il
    Why would you even want a rooster if you're going to "fix" him? It is a difficult and sometimes deadly procedure that only a vet can perform. The roo's testicles are in his chest cavity, not on the backside like most male animals.
     
  3. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    100
    321
    May 13, 2008
    If you are just now getting into chickens attempting to caponize a rooster is a big step forward, very difficult to do with good results, although it has and can be done. It is quite a task for a novice, your new rooster may end up being just fine, Don't assume he will be a mean one most are not.

    AL
     
  4. songbird

    songbird Out Of The Brooder

    97
    1
    41
    Feb 16, 2009
    New England
    I AM a vet, actually, and although I have never caponized a rooster, I am not too worried about the procedure itself. He would be safely under general anesthesia in the specialty hospital where I work, would receive post-op pain meds, and would be treated with as much care as a pet who is a family member. I may even have our exotics specialist do the procedure itself. My question isn't about the surgical procedure, but about the effects on the guy's behavior. There are roosters being given away and sold all over the place. There are seasoned people having problems with their roosters. ARe there really that many nice roosters out there, that I would be likely to have a sweet kid-friendly rooster??
     
  5. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    100
    321
    May 13, 2008
    Your a vet, well then I guess it surely would not be a problem LOl. Yes I have kept many many roosters and have only had one bad one like what you mention, but he was given to me for that reason. If you wanted the guarantee that he will be nice by all means give it a try. You know if you get a rooster and he does turn out sour then you could snip the bugger that may also quiet him down. I guess what I am saying is you do have a few options at your disposal. Good luck.

    AL
     
  6. illinichick

    illinichick Chillin' With My Peeps

    311
    0
    139
    Mar 31, 2008
    SE Il
    The answer is Yes. We have a BR roo that is as sweet as can be. My DD16 took him to the county fair for 4H and he was held by her for our Christmas postcard. When I walk into the pen he always stays clear of me or DD. But he will alllow you to pick him up. He will be a year old on Easter and he's already 2ft tall. It just depends on the roo, not whether you have him fixed.
     
  7. Birch Run Farm

    Birch Run Farm Biddy up!

    Sep 5, 2008
    VERMONT
    Keeping in mind that to chickens, humans are just another chicken and a rooster to all. That's why roosters attack 'people', to them you are another male competing for their flock. Some roosters don't like to share, others don't care.

    Caponizing may change the behavior, but I have never been around a capon so I cannot say for sure. Children get targeted because they are smaller 'roosters' and appear easier to keep away from the hens.
     
  8. chickNjake

    chickNjake Chillin' With My Peeps

    435
    0
    129
    Sep 3, 2008
    east tn
    chickens are usually just like other animals, if you hold them everyday they can be tamed easily! [​IMG] Also, you can cut their spurs off (somewhat) so you don't have to worry about that!

    and be careful, they're addicting!! [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by