caponizing roosters?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by GoldenSparrow, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. GoldenSparrow

    GoldenSparrow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what is the death rate for this surgery?
    How much does it cost, and will it stop a rooster from jumping on top of the hens?
    and what would it do for a mean rooster?


    what do ya all think about this?
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I believe the death rate varies on individual but can be pretty high if you dont know what your doing. Most people do it themselves so not sure how much a vet would charge. Im pretty sure its done before they reach maturity to prevent sex characteristics. I personally would not do it but thats just my opinion.
     
  3. moodlymoo

    moodlymoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been wondering this too. I can not bring myself to preform surgery on my birds yet I fear it is to painful for them but there is a great thread with detailed pics and step by step instructions
     
  4. trish5909

    trish5909 Out Of The Brooder

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    My understanding is that you have to do this surgery when the roosters are between 1 and 3 weeks of age so by the time a rooster is mean & jumping on hens it's too late for the procedure.
     
  5. GoldenSparrow

    GoldenSparrow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    trish5909 really I did not know that?
     
  6. trish5909

    trish5909 Out Of The Brooder

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    I've been reading about it because we thought we might try raising capons for the holidays but the surgery sounds so scary! Harvey Ussery in The Small-Scale Poultry Flock says 1-3 weeks is ideal, but we have week old chicks right now and I don't know how you can really tell males from females with a lot of accuracy at this stage??
     
  7. trish5909

    trish5909 Out Of The Brooder

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    .... also, the goal is to try to get them castrated young so that they grow more quickly without testosterone.
     
  8. oesdog

    oesdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Personally I think It is cruel to capronize. I don't see any need for it. If you want good meat birds then raise meat birds and butcher at around 18-19weeks just before they reach sexual maturity. The meat is far better at that stage than when they are older. They are also less likely to do damage to themselves or other roos while they are not sexually mature. Capronization is not going to stop a nasty roo being mean either. An axe however will!!!!! As for hens you should be making sure you have a good Hen Roo ratio to stop Hens getting damaged or use a saddle. There is never any need to "keep a caprinized Roo", if they are neither useful for Meat or breeding they are mearling a decoration for vanity sake!!! why not just get a hen at least they give you eggs!

    This is my own personal opinion. I am not in favour of anyone doing this kind of surgery on birds without any proper training. I hate the thought of putting any animal through painful surgery needlessly. If you really do still want to "butcher" your living animal for goodnessake GET A TRAINED VET TO DO IT in a proper humain way that limits the suffering of your animals.
    Here is a thread for capronisation
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=210041
    This one for saddle making
    http://backtobasicliving.com/blog/make-a-chicken-saddle/

    Hope this is helpful - though as I said personally I am against this and regard it as very cruel especially if performed without adiquate pain relief or training.
    Oesdog
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  9. Toshi

    Toshi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not to many people to this i dont think. You could lose a bird form doing so that would mean losing a meat bird. I dont think it is cruel but really i dont see the need. And the testosterone dosen't affect the meat like it would a bull, just makes it tender. [​IMG]

    Anyways i dont see the need for it. If you dont want to do it yourself. Or dont know how much it would cost. You would have to find a vet who would know what they were doing on a bird first off, who knows how much that would cost...all that just too eat it? seems like a waste to me.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011

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