Carly is a cockerel now what?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by NataleeL, Jun 25, 2016.

  1. NataleeL

    NataleeL Out Of The Brooder

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    So My 6 Easter chicks are now 15 weeks old. And one of my EE is most definitely a rooster. Started crowing yesterday.
    I have 3 EE 2 RI reds and 1 astrolop.
    I'm debating on keeping him or finding him a suitable home.
    I'm a first timer, never been around chickens before but I absolutely love it so far.
    I wanted chickens for eggs and to balance my property to keep down bugs etc.
    I live in a city where they just barely started letting people have byc however I own a property where I'm zoned for whatever I want. My neighbor has peacocks and I'm pretty sure they are louder than my rooster could ever be... So I'm not worried on that front.
    I do not want baby chicks.. But I've read as long as I gather daily and refrigerate it won't be an issue.
    I don't want my roo to be too agreasive with us or the hens. As of now he lets us pick him up and cuddle him. He is handled daily and even comes when I call him..
    Ultimately I'm just wanting to consider all things before deciding what the best thing to do is and am hoping for guidance??
    I had planned to possibly get a few more chickens added to my flock over the years but for us They are pets and I want to make sure I'm doing what is best. I've even looked into having him "fixed" but reading how it can be So inhumane I know that definitely won't be happening.
    Help me consider all possible senerios, your opinions etc so I can make the best possible choice...
    Thank you!!
     
  2. CluckerCottage

    CluckerCottage Chillin' With My Peeps

    Since you can have a roo, keep him and give things a try! Roos are great protectors.
    You may wish to get a few more girls for him, though.
    Perhaps in the future you'll wish to start a breeding program!
    If you decide that he's too rough on your girls, send him to freezer camp or rehome him.
     
  3. NataleeL

    NataleeL Out Of The Brooder

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    I am adopting 2 1 year old hens soon when my friend moves to Germany. Do you think 7 hens to 1 roo is a good number?
    Also how do you think he will take to new comers he wasn't raised with?
     
  4. cluckcluckgirl

    cluckcluckgirl Queen of the Coop Premium Member

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    Tending to my chickens
    I'd say you can definitely give him a try. He's fairly young now, so his hormones haven't fully kicked in and if you introduce the 2 new hens, he may adapt to them fairly well. A 7-to-1 ratio is pretty good, but each flock is unique and you may find it's a good number or you may need just a few more hens.
     
  5. NataleeL

    NataleeL Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2016
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    Is 5 to 1 a definite no go?
     
  6. CluckerCottage

    CluckerCottage Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't think 5/1 is a good ratio, sorry.
    A young cockerel can/will wear the feathers right off their backs and can cause them to be too nervous to lay when the time comes.
    Stressed hens=no or very few eggs.
    Most folks recommend 10-12 hens per each roo.
     
  7. cluckcluckgirl

    cluckcluckgirl Queen of the Coop Premium Member

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    Tending to my chickens
    It depends. I know a lot of people will say no, but I had a group of 2 roosters once in my flock of 8 hens (it was my first batch and I couldn't bring myself to sell one unless they deserved it), and the flock was fine because the two roosters didn't overmate and got along great. While a lot of roosters do overmate the hens, some don't, so time is ultimately the best way to see.
     
  8. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    On the MN prairie.
    There are a lot of things to consider. You don't want to hatch out chicks, so you don't need a rooster. A 5 to 1 ratio can work, depending on your flock's personality, and if they have plenty of room (do you free range?). After all, people keep breeding pens of one rooster and two hens with no problem. As Mrs. K says, roosters can be a crap shoot. You don't know what he's going to be like until he matures. If he turns out to be a bad one, you need to have a plan to get rid of him ASAP. If you have small children who live at or visit your place, I'd definitely get rid of him. Roosters can be tricky. The friendly, inquisitive darling chick can turn into a demon when he hits maturity. If you decide to keep him, I'd suggest making sure he knows to move away from you every time you go out to your birds. Some people take a herding stick, long pole, some such thing as that to just move their roosters along out of their way. I would not make a pet of him. That can turn into trouble. Not always, but this forum is full of "my pet rooster just started attacking me" posts.
     

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