Carotenoides . Eumélanique Phaeomelanine

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by Jack07, Jan 16, 2015.

  1. Jack07

    Jack07 Out Of The Brooder

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    for me, we find the same color mutations in all birds
    for studying the opal mutation in canaries and some native birds I can explain it to the peacock
    I think for example that at the Cameo became black melanin phaeomelanin (brown) but difference between Cameo and purple
    I also think eumelanin (black) is more or less important in mitnight Charcoal taupe bronze etc but how to explain
    a question I ask myself why a long blackshoulder it is white á birth why does he male will darken in 2 á 3 years, while the female remains clear ????

    If this forum I could find someone who could help me I would be delighted

    Thank you in advance
     
  2. All good questions. I don't think you will find anyone with exact answers, only opinions.

    I don't have any idea.
     
  3. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sorry about the stupid question, but what is a " long blackshoulder" is there a "short" blackshoulder?
    I obviously can't help with your question. I know in Arabian horses, grays are born with the recessive gene that they are carrying color and gradually change to gray/white. But horses aren't sexually dimorphic and peas are.
     
  4. I think the "long" is just a mis-translation.
     
  5. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    @Jack07
    Pourriez l'écriver en francais aussi? La traduction a eu une petit probleme et nous ne comprends tout a fait vos question
     
  6. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have asked jacky to give us the question in french also because there is some sort of slight difficulty with the translation
     
  7. Jack07

    Jack07 Out Of The Brooder

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    Merci Garden Peas pour votre remarque
    Ce soir ( dans environ 7heures) je fais un résumé de toutes mes question à propos de la couleurs des plumes chez les oiseaux et influence de telle ou telle mutation sur cette couleur
     
  8. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Merci Jacky, est ce que c'est possible qu'on peut voir la liste en français?
     
  9. Dany12

    Dany12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would say that Black shoulder is kind of sex-linked color ... only males darken .So the genes are placed on the ♂ gene .

    Je dirais que Black shoulder est une sorte de coloration liée au sexe ... seul les mâles noircissent .Donc les gènes responsables sont placés sur le gènes du sexe ♂ .

    This picture is an old blue barred peahen ( 16 years old ).... Does the old blackshoulder peahen turn black on her old age ?

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Non, @Dany12 , ça n'a pas raison.

    Quand nous disons "liée au sexe", ça veut dire les gènes qui sont place sur les gènes du sexe. On le voit en patterne heritage, la femmelle ne peut pas les transmettre au poussines.

    La gène nigripenne doit etre passer par les deux parents pour que les poussin soient nigripennes, alor la gène ne lie pas sur la gène sexe.

    Oui, c'est vrai que le paon s'enfonce, mais quand même la paonne nigripenne devient beaucoup plus claire...

    Ne melangez l'expression phenotype avec la question de genotype! Tous les couleurs des paons s'expressent different dans les deux sexes! Cela est le dimorphisme sexuel, ce n'est pas la meme chose que les genes liee au sexe.

    Je ne sais d'ou vous avez trouvez cette photo, mais les couleurs ne me semble pas vrai. Peut etre artifact de la lumière?

    No, Dany, that is not correct. When we say "sex-linked", that refers to genes which are located on the sex gene. We see this expressed in the pattern of inheritance, the female cannot transmit the gene to female chicks.

    The blackshoulder gene must be passed by both parents for the chick to be blackshoulder, therefore the gene does not lie on the sex gene.

    Yes, it is true that the male darkens, but the black shoulder hen becomes much lighter in color.

    Don't mix the phenotype expression with the question of genotype! All the colors in peafowl express differently in the two sexes. That is sexual dimorphism, which is not the same as sex-linked genes.

    I don't know where you found this photo, but the colors do not seem to be correct. Perhaps an artifact of the lighting?
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015

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