Carpentry questions

Discussion in 'DIY / Self Sufficiency' started by Ole and Lena, Sep 26, 2016.

  1. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    I'm building a 12x16 single room cabin up on my hunting land. My cousin was supposed to help, but the plant he works at just went into emergency mode, so he's pulling 6 day weeks until further notice.

    I've already framed the floor. 4x6 rim, joined timber frame style, with a center 4x6 timber running the long way. All on concrete footings, 6'x8'spacing. Furred and battened bottom side with treated plywood, R16 batting and 1/2" plywood subfloor sheeting. Nested joists under aprox 5'7 span (can't remember the exact measurement) on AC2 rated hangers 2x6, 16 on center between the rim and stringer. My cousin had a fit, saying this wasn't proper framing, but it exactly matched the plans I was following for a similar single story cabin and satisfies local code as far as I can decipher it. Is this proper for a single room cabin with no appliances? It seems remarkably solid. With thicker decking I could park a truck on it.

    Walls are pretty standard 2x6 framing, 7'6 with LP sheet siding that will overlap the rim.

    Big question is on the roof trusses. I'm using a 6/12 pitch steel roof. Snow loading will be moderate, little wind exposure, 1/2" OSB sheeting. My plans call for a 2x4 rafter with 3/12 2x4 floating scissor trusses staked 6" above the top plate and a nailing block at intersection of the scissors. Rafters secured to top plate with metal hangers. Thoughts, opinions? Total span will be 12'1" with siding overlap.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  2. gremlin

    gremlin Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 10, 2016
    Minnesota
    What spacing are you using for your trusses? 16in on center? That's what I would recommend with site built trusses.
     
  3. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    You're a little bit late to the party, but thanks for the reply. We built the sucker without the scissor truss, just a 3' 2x4 cross tie figuring we could retrofit later if necessary. Did some more research and stumbled on an engineering drawing for exactly the same span and pitch of roof we are doing, and it's rated for "severe" snow load when coupled with a 2x6 and sheeted wall of 8' height or less, double top plate and steel rafter ties.

    After building it, I can see why. This thing is a brick "S" house. We built, braced and plumbed the gable ends first, then ran a string line on tension between the gable peaks. Left the cross tie floated, trueing the rafter peaks to the line, tacking all to a temporary purlin, then staking the cross tie and taking out some slop at the tails. Not the truest roof ever built, but it's solid and square enough to line up the sheeting and steel panels on across the 16' length. Got a lucky pick at Menards, they had a freshly opened pallet of Canadian spruce 2x4 that were very straight, solid and true. Perfect rafter lumber, light and very strong.
     

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