CarPort Coop ?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by adkins90, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. adkins90

    adkins90 Truly Obsessed...

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    Jan 30, 2007
    Huntington, WV
    Has anyone turned a carport into a coop? If so, do you have pics...needing ideas.

    Michelle
     
  2. WestKnollAmy

    WestKnollAmy The Crazy Chicken Lady

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    Apr 22, 2008
    upstate SC
    I was looking at the carports with the little building attached on one end for a coop and pen but didn't want to pay that much. If I had an old one just laying around I would have done it.

    I think you could add tin to the sides and frame in the front and back with wood. I would really have to think about it to figure out how to do it but it sounds like a good plan on your part.
    Good luck![​IMG]
     
  3. TaLani

    TaLani ~ Gemini Chick ~

    Oct 2, 2008
    Bryson City, NC
    We did something similar to what you've mentioned. We turned our carport into a work shop/garage. So, don't know why you couldn't do the same thing, just coop size. My hubby used self taping screws for metal to attach plywood to each metal support bar & then painted all the wood. Turned out great...for a work shop/garage any way. Just a thought. [​IMG]
     
  4. Mojo Chick'n

    Mojo Chick'n Empress of Chickenville

    I turned a carport into a barn - probably similar to building it for a coop - just add in different interiors.

    We got the carport - then put 2x4 along the inside wall, to reinforce those (we were using it for donkeys and horses - they like to rub and lean on anything that doesn't fall over [​IMG] ) For chickens you probably wouldn't have to reinforce the inside walls. We then put in a back wall (on one end) and an open front wall (on the other end) and built a stall in it about 1/4 of the way from the back wall. There are two windows in the back wall, and the front is an open large door.
    The stall was to put hay into, and our feeder bins, to keep the donkeys and horses out of the feed, but it could be used for a pen for giving birth, or whatever. We are actually moving the feed and planning to put a door into the back of it, (off the pig pen we built) and use the stall as a "pig house".

    A couple of things to make sure you do --

    situate it so the breeze can blow through the ends of it, because that is the easiest place to put your windows and vents when you build the ends onto it. It gets hot in the summer (well, ours is green, a white one probably would reflect heat better, but the green absorbs more winter sun, if you live in a colder climate). Otherwise, you'll have to cut holes in the actual metal sides, which is easy enough to do, but they will have to be trimmed out with wood or something, because that metal is sharp.

    Maybe put a blower vent in the top of it - one of those twirly round vents that just move in the breeze and suck the hot air out of the top - I picked one up at a yard sale for 15 bucks - not sure how much they cost new. I don't have ours installed yet.

    Ok, I don't have good pics of the interior, but here is our barn....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    eta - the ends were done with 2x4 framing and those wavy steel sheets - we bought a pile of them, used, for a buck each. We then painted it to match the rest of the metal, and the framing was white so we did the front and back framing in white, also.

    meri
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2009
  5. adkins90

    adkins90 Truly Obsessed...

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    Jan 30, 2007
    Huntington, WV
    Wow! That looks amazing. I'm thinking of just having the metal roof, and enclosing the rest with wood, might help with heat in the summer? ya think?

    I new the double carport would give me lots of room, with lots of different options, just needed to get some visual ideas.

    Michelle
    in winter wonderland west virginia.
     
  6. Mojo Chick'n

    Mojo Chick'n Empress of Chickenville

    Quote:Yeah, it would be better, probably if ya just had the roof, then enclosed the sides in wood - that way you could do the windows and vents easier.

    The roof is always the hardest part of building something, IMO [​IMG]

    meri
     
  7. crtrlovr

    crtrlovr Still chillin' with my peeps

    Mojo, looks like you guys did a phenomenal job! Kudos! [​IMG]
     
  8. Mojo Chick'n

    Mojo Chick'n Empress of Chickenville

    Quote:Thanks, I love it, it was much easier than trying to build a barn from scratch. Actually, if we weren't into building wooden ones now (didn't think we could before) I'd put in another one - I may do it anyway, if I can find a good carport cheap - sometimes I find them down here when people are moving, the singles anyway.

    I'd love to find one to put out back for ducks and geese. Plus, we're planning to build another pasture over on the other side of the house, we'll need a barn there - if we don't do the carport thing, we'll just build a lean-to type shelter probably.

    meri
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2009
  9. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    I used a "carport" to build a "barn". The company set up the basic structure, and I closed it in myself.
    It was FAR cheaper and easier than I could have done a wood frame building. It's 18 X 36:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Mojo Chick'n

    Mojo Chick'n Empress of Chickenville

    Nice !

    Ours is an 18x22 if I had thought more about it, I would have gotten a bigger one. We only had one horse at the time [​IMG] should have thought ahead, I guess. Now I have that horse, plus 9.5 donkeys. We've built other shelters for them to get out of the weather, of course, but the barn was easier to work with than building our own from scratch.

    meri
     

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