CAT help

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Equest94, May 12, 2008.

  1. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    New York
    I have a 13yro black & white domestic shorthair (female) feline. Well, I noticed she has really bad mats on her back.... the fur just clumps in hard balls. She use to get this before, she use to be really chubby and we figured that the mats were because she had trouble grooming her lower back... she had lost a ton of weight since then and I noticed that the mats are [back and] really bad. I brush her, they come back, I shave her, they come back, I bathe her, they come back...

    I don't know what to do. I never heard of a cat, let alone a shorthaired cat getting mats, usually they just shed out the fur...

    I can't think of anything that she could get into/rub on that would cause this.

    Any suggestions? I know it's not a huge concern, but I really don't like my cat all matted.... :|
     
  2. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    I had a short hair cat that used to do the same thing. I think with her it was she had an undercoat of a soft thick fur that started the mats. I spent many hours trimming her and brushing her. I lost her to cancer last summer.
     
  3. thechickenchick

    thechickenchick Born city, Living country

    Mar 8, 2008
    Eaton, Colorado
    My friend had a cat with the same problem. It was because her arthritis was keeping her from being able to reach certian areas to groom herself. The vet precsribed something for her. I am sorry I don't know what it was. I am sure your vet would know what would make her move easier. Do you think that could be the problem? Good luck with kitty! Before I became the crazy chicken lady I was the crazy cat lady![​IMG]
     
  4. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    New York
    Katy, I'm so sorry for your loss. I think my cat has a very soft undercoat as well which may be the main cause of the issue.

    thechickenchick - I'm not sure if mine has arthritis, she still seems able to sprint and leap well, but who knows? I mean, she is getting older, so I'm sure some stiffness may be starting. I will ask the vet about the prescription the next time she has to go in.


    Thank you both.
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    I used to have a cat who was a shorthair but clearly had longhair blood in him back somewhere because he had a VERY plushy undercoat. I used to comb the worst parts, and the rear half of his back was part of it, using a metal flea comb once or twice every week. I know that sounds a little odd but I found that the flea comb would pull out the shed undercoat fibers pretty well. You have to kind of get used to it so that you have the right touch, not 'grabbing in' too much and getting the comb stuck so that it pulls at the cat.

    I don't know if this would help you but it might be worth trying.

    Also, you're sure that it's *just* mats, not aggravated by oozing from flea allergy sores? (I figure you would probably know already, but just in case, it seemed worth mentioning)

    Pat
     
  6. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    New York
    Pat,

    No, there's no flea sores on her and the mats aren't sticky or crusty...it's just a ball of fur. I ended up taking my heavy duty horse clippers shaved her (she was not happy!) Her skin appears to be normal (no hives or wounds), but I'm just getting so frustrated with these mats, when I go to pet my cat, I don't want to feel those, lol.


    I have a plastic flea comb, but that doesn't seem to help. I'll pick up a metal one the next time I go to a pet store.

    Thanks for your suggestion, I will try it.
     
  7. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Pat....I used a flea comb on mine too....didn't even think to mention that. That worked the best.
     
  8. snugglepup

    snugglepup Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2007
    Creedmoor, NC
    It means the cat isn't grooming properly. We see it frequently in obese cats because they can't reach those areas to groom. Did she loose a lot of weight suddenly? I'm wondering about diabetes or hyperthyroidism. Either could cause a cat to loose weight and stop grooming herself. CRF could too, but they usually seem sick by that point.
     
  9. Equest94

    Equest94 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    New York
    snugglepup,

    Thanks for your advice. She went from being almost 20lbs [​IMG] to 11lbs ("normal" cat weight). I'm mostly away at school, so when I'd come home, I thought it was a pretty abrupt change, but my parents say it's more gradual.

    Still, I ask the vet about any sickness she could have that would trigger a sudden weight loss and got her tested for them and all came up negative.

    We did have my cat on a special diet and this was also around the time we lost our dog (she got hit by a car) and then adopted our new dog. The vet said that if anything this is probably a mix of stress, diet, and the fact she is just getting older...

    I am worried about her regardless, but she seems less stressed, get's a long nicely with our new dog, moves around/play, and overall looks pretty good for her age expect for the mats (which I just shaved so now she has a nice buzz stripe down her back, lol)


    I will get her re-tested though. Thanks
     

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