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Cat problems

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Kneedles, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. Kneedles

    Kneedles Chirping

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    Recently, a cat has been visiting my backyard, and its presence is starting to concern me. A large portion of my backyard consists of an enclosure for my rabbits, which is also where my hen usually stays. Cats have come into my backyard before, but I do not think that my rabbits are in extreme danger when this happens. Now that I own a chicken, though, I am far more worried about the situation. Just this morning, I saw the cat lying atop a compost bin; seemingly using it as a vantage point to look into their enclosure. I would put my hen in her coop, but she always becomes restless and angry when I do, probably because of her lack of freedom.
    Is there anything that I can do about this? Thanks in advance to any help.
     

  2. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Crowing

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    Hello & welcome!! [​IMG] Water pistols are a great deterrent to cats'. How old/big is your hen? Unless the cat is truly starving, I think it would be unlikely to attack a full grown hen, I think your rabbits would be a more likely target. Both my cats give the chickens a very wide berth when in the yard. Does the enclosure have netting over the top? This might prevent kitty from getting any nearer. Good luck with it,
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Kneedles

    Kneedles Chirping

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    Unfortunately, my hen is not fully-grown; she is slightly over half a year old. I will try to put netting over the top of the enclosure. Thank you for your time.
     
  4. What you can do depends upon the laws of your State and your locality...

    In many areas if the cat is on your property not under the owners direct supervision (aka you can tell the owner to remove the cat from your property right that second) or you have given permission to the cats owner to use your property, and it's harassing or endangering livestock it's fair game to remove it from the gene pool...

    Beyond that you can always fortify your chickens against attack...

    If you choose to pursue drastic measure check your State and local laws, to avoid legal problems...
     
  5. waynem1983

    waynem1983 Chirping

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    Cats dont touch my hens, my BO's are the size of small dinosaurs, but even my 4 month old hybrid blyebell has been safe. I have a cat and the buebell actively confronts him, charges at him and will peck at him if he gets too close.

    I have also watched neighbours cats come and go, ones much larger than my own and they stay well clear.
     
  6. waynem1983

    waynem1983 Chirping

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    And heres them havim breakfast together

    [​IMG]
     
  7. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer Premium Member

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    Honestly, you never really know what a cat will do. I've had farm cats raised with broody hens and would never risk the wrath of Mama hen to get a chick snack. Feral or stray cats, however, may be hungry enough to tackle any sort of prey they deem worthy of the risk.

    Your responsibility to to protect your animals as best as you can. Predator proof your pens by securing the top and bottom. And to keep your pullet happy in her coop, provide her with some sort of entertainment. Put scratch feed in a 16 oz plastic bottles which has enough holes which will dispense the feed as she pecks at the bottle. Give her greens and a place to dust bathe in.

    A cat will do what it is allowed to do. For me, the biggest problem with stray/feral cats is the kittens they have. Be warned that cats will multiply at an incredible rate. Around my place, feral cats are trapped and sent to the animal shelter. Some people may disagree with this but my job is to keep my flock safe, not to be a halfway house for stray cats. Not to mention they like to use my hay for a litter box thus ruining it for the horses.

    Don't get me wrong, I'll take care of an injured pet cat in need of a home. I've been known to pay for a fractured leg and give the cat to someones lonely Granny.
     
    1 person likes this.

  8. Kneedles

    Kneedles Chirping

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    As far as I know, it is completely legal to kill cats (domestic, stray or feral) without consequence where I live, but I do not wish to do that.
     
  9. All 50 states have animal cruelty laws that apply to 'domestic' cats, but in many states when they are causing loses or damages, different laws can apply... In many/most states if they are 'domestic' and just trespassing (not causing loses or damage to livestock) the proper legal course of action is to call the 'dog catcher' and let them catch and impound the cat...

    As I said to be on the legal side consult and know your local laws, even if it's something like live trapping them for removal...
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Kneedles

    Kneedles Chirping

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    I actually live in New Zealand, not the US, so it is probable that those laws do not apply here. Because cats are considered to be an extreme threat to the native bird and reptile species here, they are being persecuted by some. Cruelty to cats, however, probably remains illegal.
     

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