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catching a raccoon?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by bobeena, Oct 23, 2007.

  1. bobeena

    bobeena In the Brooder

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    Oct 23, 2007
    We lost a barred rock hen to a gruesome raccoon attack (through the wall of the pen). It's come back repeatedly and while we're trying to predator-proof the run, we've been housing the two remaining hens in the garage. We have a live trap sent for the coon but it keeps getting the bait without being caught. I've wired the bait inside, buried it in a shallow depression beneath the trap, etc. etc. Nothing. Tips? We live in the city and plan to tote the cage and critter in a wagon in the wee hours of the morning several miles away to a greenway.
    (So, second question: If we get it, is this too close and will it return?)
     

  2. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    May 25, 2007
    SW Wisconsin
    Is he tripping the trap? Try covering the outside with a tarp or something so he has to go in and can't reach in from the outside. Is the trap big enough for a coon? Is it possible the door is falling on its back and allowing them to back out?

    I don;t know about relocating them. Here's an excerpt I found from a site on coons:

    Raccoons often cause significant damage to agricultural crops such as corn and lesser damage in orchards, vineyards, melon patches, and poultry yards. They are considered undesirable in areas being managed for waterfowl or upland game birds because they destroy nests and eat young. In urban areas considerable damage to residential roofs, garages, gardens, and lawns has been blamed on raccoons. Often the only solution is to remove the offending animals by trapping or hunting. Problem animals are often live trapped and moved to other localities. This practice, however, may contribute to disease transmission. Recent studies have shown that relocated raccoons travel long distances in short periods and are thus an ideal vehicle for transmitting contagious diseases such as rabies.
     
  3. bobeena

    bobeena In the Brooder

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    Oct 23, 2007
    Good ideas on the trap...it might be too small and the door might be resting on the raccoon's back. It has not tripped the trap (though I've done so, to check to see if it's working). Yikes on relocating. We are trying not to put this thing in our car. Though at this rate, it'll keep eating our honeybuns and honey-soaked bread and never get caught.
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Jan 27, 2007
    BOCOMO
    we live in the city

    Does your city have animal control? Maybe they have ideas specific to your location or will come and take care of it for you. A raccoon that is `cityfied' (hanging out around humans exclusively) can be difficult to corner. They carry rabies and are known to be more aggressive towards humans in urban/suburban settings where they've been having their way with human's trash/food/birds...

    If you don't want to poison it (as it knows traps, obviously), then call animal control and tell them it hissed at you and acted strangely (get them out to you faster), they'll know what to do.

    Good luck!​
     
  5. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    SW Wisconsin
    Try something firmer for bait that they can really tug at instead of just chewing the bread off. Wire some uncooked bacon or a meaty pork chop bone or something in place. I'm not sure what kind of trigger it has, but see if you can adjust it for the least resistance.
     
  6. cheeptrick

    cheeptrick Songster

    May 1, 2007
    New Hampshire
    We tie a huge trash can up against a tree near the coop and throw some meat down in it...2-3 nights go by and lo and behold WE catch him...throw the lid on...put the can in the back of the truck and drive him 40 miles away! [​IMG]
    You should have seen us when we caught a skunk! [​IMG]
    FYI tomato juice does NOT work...
     
  7. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    You should have seen us when we caught a skunk!
    FYI tomato juice does NOT work...

    Cheeptrick, I like whatever works but, they next time you `rehome' a skunk in a lidded garbage can, remember to take a video camera in case you get pulled over for a traffic stop.

    I don't even want to imagine how the conversation with officer would go, but I'm sure as can be it would go viral around the world on youtube... [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2007

  8. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    My trap for small wild coons is I think 14 x 16 x30 inches but may be larger. Half of trapping is cage placement. I bait with marshmellows and put the cage in a natural walking path of the coon so that it walks into before it knows it. if food is taken and no coon... are you sure it is not rats stealing the goods?
     
  9. cheeptrick

    cheeptrick Songster

    May 1, 2007
    New Hampshire
    Quote:Cheeptrick, I like whatever works but, they next time you `rehome' a skunk in a lidded garbage can, remember to take a video camera in case you get pulled over for a traffic stop.

    I don't even want to imagine how the conversation with officer would go, but I'm sure as can be it would go viral around the world on youtube... [​IMG]

    LOL [​IMG] You should have seen my dh when I told him what we had caught...NO time for a camera!! We weren't sprayed...neither was the can believe it or not. But I looked it up just in case...when you/pets get skunked remember the spray is an OIL and that you need SOAP to break down the oil. That poor baby skunk just sat there terrified...didn't raise up it's BUM in the can at all. DH said the can did smell funky...but NOT bad. I sprayed it down with soap and water and the skunky smell is gone. [​IMG]
     
  10. SandraChick

    SandraChick Songster

    I agree with previous posters....

    1. Cover the trap so they can't get the bait trough the caging
    2. Make sure it's weighted down-- coons will lift the cage and "dump" the bait out to eat it. Or, they will eat the bait from beneath it through the cage where you've tied it.
    3. Firmer bait. If you're not too grossed out--- use the remaining parts of your dead chickens- after all that's what they came for. Otherwise, use some chicken bought from the store.

    4. Tie the bait as far from the "walls" as possible and as close to the trip treddle as possible. Well tied down, the attempts to rip it off will increase the likelyhood that they will step on the treddle

    5. Oh...don't forget to test the treddle!!! Use a stick through the cage and see how much force you need to trip it. Adjust as necessary.

    6. If you keep catching cats-- try marshmellows with a drop of vanilla (learned this from some trappers)

    GOOD LUCK---once coons are trap smart, they're very difficult to trap.....another reason NOT to tanslocate them, but rather dispatch them. They become another person's problem...additionally, when you move them to a new area, they will often die of starvation as you put them in some other racoons territory....

    Once trap smart....the best way to rid yourself of coons, is to stay up all night and shoot them in the act.

    OH...depending on where you live you can also try leg traps...it's illegal in California though.

    Sandra
     

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