Catching Chickens.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by GalloNegrito, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. GalloNegrito

    GalloNegrito Out Of The Brooder

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    So as I have stated in past threads, I have a few free roaming chickens in my backyard that I can't seem to keep in a cage for too long. I try just running around or surprise catching, nothing works too well. Plus I tend to rough up their feathers in the end trying to catch them. So I decided to go for a more humane trap that will require less force and be better for both the chicken and I both. I'm going to buy a trap, a standard trap used for coyotes, racoons and such. Only problem is that I don't know what trap works best, or it will even work. What dimension trap should I buy for the chickens and if you have any experince with it yourself, what bait should I use and what should I keep in mind?

    Thanks.
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I don't think traps are a good idea, I don't believe a chicken would go into one, and they could get hurt when it snaps shut. It's best to wait until dark to catch chickens, otherwise a net can work well.
     
  3. allychick

    allychick New Egg

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    Apr 24, 2016
    I don't know if you have tried this before but if you consistently feed them in an enclosed place with a perch usually they go right in every night and you can close the door... this is what i do with my free range chickens and it works great. Good luck!
     
  4. CuckooOrpington

    CuckooOrpington Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know if a trap is entirely safe for chickens... It is easy to catch them while they are asleep if you know/can access their sleeping area. If they are a flighty breed they may perch in trees at night, other breeds usually sleep on low branches/fences ect. If you do want to use a 'trap' you can get a dog crate/chicken carrier cage and put chicken grain in the cage. Watch them from a distance, when the birds go in quickly shut the door (this has worked before for extremely hard to catch chooks).

    A net is also useful, you can buy one from a camping/fishing store. If you have a pen and someone else to help you, you can herd the chooks into the pen. Walk slowly at the birds pace, after some experience it becomes pretty easy to predict what direction the chooks will run in.

    Once you have cauht your birds, lock them in a pen for a few weeks. Feed them there, provide egg boxes, water and you can give them table scraps to make it a happy environment for them. Let them out in 2 - 3 weeks and you will find that they return to the pen at dusk.
     

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