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Cauliflower Caruncles - What do they mean?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Lagerdogger, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. Lagerdogger

    Lagerdogger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2010
    Aitkin, MN
    Dysfunctional turkey people...or people who know about dysfunctional turkeys...

    I have 35 turkeys right now, and two of them have caruncles that look to be made of cauliflower. Each caruncle that is normally one smooth bump is segmented. Even the little caruncles on top of the head are divided into sub-caruncles. Both of the odd birds are Bourbon red hens. No other hens look abnormal, and the BR toms look fine. I know a picture would be awesome and appropriate here. Just been too busy.

    Does anyone know what causes this carucle deformation? I searched this site for cauliflower caruncles and caruncle disease, but found nothing.

    Thanks.
     
  2. maybejoey

    maybejoey got chickenidous?

  3. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Yep, nothing much on atypical growth of sexual ornamentation in meleagris gallopavo/amplectic caruncular development meleagris gallopavo/nothing I can find on dermatological viral disorders in avians that prompts `fracturing', hopeful that someone has seen this before and will enlighten us.

    When you get the time please take a shot of both birds sporting the `subdivisions'.

    Still trying to grok the particulars of anomalous circulation: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=131987&p=1
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2011
  4. Lagerdogger

    Lagerdogger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aitkin, MN
    Quote:When I clicked this, all I got was "image not available" Bummer.
     
  5. Lagerdogger

    Lagerdogger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2010
    Aitkin, MN
    Here are some pictures of one of the birds. Of course, the camera batteries were dying so I could only get a couple of shots.


    Here is one hen. Look at the lowest caruncle. On all other birds this is a smooth bump.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a closer look.

    [​IMG]

    Even the top of the head is divided into mini bumps.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2011
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Got PM (sorry for not replying sooner, time constraints suck).

    I'm gonna guess testosterone (maybe functioning ovary in these hens are not 100% and caruncle/wattle development is favored owing to the imbalance between testosterone/estrogen). The tissue looks healthy. Why those specific areas are `over developed'? I've been wondering about this, myself. Have a Slate hen with only a couple of `caruncle like' growths on head (worried about Fowl Pox, initially - 3yrs ago) maybe irritation (follicle/insect bite) triggered development:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If the overgrowth continues and develops into a tumor like protrusion (hanging ball of `brain') then get it checked out.

    Speaking of brains, I was out shooting pics and found it interesting that both brain development in vertebrates (our species in particular) and development of caruncles/wattles in turks (succuli/gyri) reflect homologous function in that both are about packing the maximum amount of information, about reproductive fitness in both cases, in the minimum amount of space:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Sorry, nothing much more than `blue skying' but, this post will bump and maybe someone else will have a definitive handle on this.

    (please post up shots in a couple of months if this `progression' leaves them looking like `The Elephant hens' = not expecting it - but I've had to insure myself against `being blindsided').


    Good Luck!
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2011

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