Cedar? PLEASE ANSWER ASAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by MattalynsBarn, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. MattalynsBarn

    MattalynsBarn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering if it's safe to use cedar for the legs? They'll be about a foot tall
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2010
  2. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm assuming you mean cedar to build the posts for an elevated coop? Yes, that's fine.
     
  3. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    Yep cedar for building is fine.. Cedar chios are a big no no ...
     
  4. MattalynsBarn

    MattalynsBarn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks!!! We're building the coop right now and it occurred to me that it might not be okay
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    There is also a big difference in red cedar and white cedar. The aromatic red causes issues; the white (western, I think) is really not an issue. However, I don;t think it is an insect pervious, either.
     
  6. AtholCoop

    AtholCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seems like this whole "Cedar Thing" needs a sticky...

    Structural and trim are cool just NOT cedar shavings for bedding.
     
  7. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I work with Northern White Cedar on a daily basis.

    Three basic kinds of cedar.
    Aromatic: The kind used for closet liners.
    Western Red Cedar: A big tree and the cedar most often found in lumber stores for building with. It grows in the Pacific Northwest.
    Northern White Cedar: Found in northern US and Southern Canada. Usually only available in regions where it grows, as it is too small a tree for big commercial operations.

    The heart wood of old growth cedar is what is very rot/insect resistant, Most of the Western Red Cedar on the market is second growth and not as long lasting as in days of old. (But still good.) Most of the Northern White cedar is old growth, however larger dimensional lumber sized pieces are not that common.

    As far as hazard for humans, long term exposure to all fresh cedar dust is a health hazard. Technically aromatic being the worst, western red being the second worst, and northern white being the least bad. Thought the difference is not that big.

    I would not line the walls of a coup with aromatic cedar closet liner! Nor would I use cedar shavings on the coop floor. But I feel strongly that Northern White or Western Red Cedar lumber is fine to use inside or outside the coop.

    If you can not smell it then it is fine. Keep in mind it is all about long term exposures. Please still enjoy the great fresh scent of cedar...[​IMG] Just don't use shavings for bedding.[​IMG]

    ON
     
  8. MattalynsBarn

    MattalynsBarn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys! I agree that there should be a cedar sticky. We're just using it for the legs, so there wont be much on the coop, but I don't know what type it is. Again, thanks for all your help!
     
  9. jaj121159

    jaj121159 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Red Cedar grows very well and abundantly in the mid-west. Nebraska and South Dakota are covered with it. Matter of fact it is considered a weed by many in Nebraska because it grows in pastures and is a fast growing (a foot or more per year) tree with little or no value unless it gets to mature size. The white cedar has flat needles and a stringy bark it also likes to grow in wet areas, hence the cedar swamps in Michigan. The red cedar has a bark and overall shape that looks more like a pine tree. Its needles are short and look a lot like a juniper's. It also smells and has little blue berries like a juniper.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Thanks Organic! I knew a little and you corrected and filled in A LOT!
     

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