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Cedar Shavings; Beating a dead horse?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by PegramPoultryProprietor, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. PegramPoultryProprietor

    PegramPoultryProprietor Out Of The Brooder

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    For the moment I have removed all cedar shaving from the bedding I use on my floor cages for my juvenile chicks due to the overwhelming posts against them, BUT, I would really appreciate anyone who can direct me to the scientific studies that created what seem to be facts. I cannot find anything that says they are toxic; only the there is a slight risk of damage to respiratory systems that could lead to poultry being more susceptible to respiratory illness that may be present to infect them. I always want to do the right thing, but I also want to base it on something besides "someone told me that someone said".Thank you very much to anyone that can help me understand.
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

  3. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have an answer for you...but even with a slight risk, why bother when you can use pine shavings? Which is what I use...that is one less thing I worry about....hope you find the answer you are looking for.
     
  4. PegramPoultryProprietor

    PegramPoultryProprietor Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I'm finding some of the same vague suggestions that pine shavings are just as bad?
     
  5. chisNchickens

    chisNchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cedar and pine shavings both contain phenols, oils in the wood that are aromatic and toxic. Cedar is worse than pine, but both can cause respiratory damage. I would think that it would be ok for birds as long as there is a lot of ventilation and they aren't constantly on the floor. With rodents, especially rats kept in aquariums with little ventilation, the phenols damage the lungs which allow already existing mycoplasma bacteria to further damage the respiratory system.
    Do a search on cedar or pine toxicity and phenols.
     
  6. NottinghamChicks

    NottinghamChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    I had a friend who used them in her "tote" brooder and within three days they started to become ill. I happened to be sitting them for her at my house and immediately went online and saw MANY warnings against cedar for small animals. I think that the chips/shaving are enhanced with extra oils for added fragrance. She only used them so that I would not have to deal with the smell which is silly becasue I am a chicken person and their poo smells no worse than my own chickens. Well one was too far gone before I realized the issue and another was well on its wat so I cleaned the tote out and put in pine, ventillated the porch better and hoped for the best. The other one did die also so that was two in less than 3 full days of cedar exposure. Poor things. I would never risk it it just isn't worth it. Clean your coop often, use poop boards, and have good vetillation. If you don't want any smell, don't have any animals. [​IMG]
     
  7. chisNchickens

    chisNchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Additionally, the best wood chip product to use is aspen. That is what I use for my rats and have for a decade or better. Aspen is a harder wood and has very little aroma/oil.
     
  8. PegramPoultryProprietor

    PegramPoultryProprietor Out Of The Brooder

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    Would hardwood sawdust or shavings be better? I have access to several saw mills that cut oak and poplar and have sawdust for free. I am always concerened about chicks ingesting something that looks like food? And as for that comment about smell and not haveing pets; really needed?
     
  9. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The article cited above by Teach is probably the best reasoning you are going to find on the topic of what to use for bedding. I believe that both of them are probably OK but I have decided to use the pine shavings because it just seems to me that they are a bit drier and absorb better than the cedar. Also, they are considerably cheaper then cedar shavings.
     
  10. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    If you MUST use cedar, use one bag of hardwood shavings and half a bag or less of cedar. Other than that, I would not use them in nesting boxes, its too closed in particuarly if you have broody hens. Sevin dust and regular shavings in nesting boxes or shredded newspapers is the best.

    I love cedar but not worth the risk.
     

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