Cement slab coop?

MN-chick

Hatching
Jun 5, 2020
4
2
5
Hi! I’m new here, my husband and I recently bought laying hen chicks. We are building a coop this weekend. I’ve live in Minnesota, so our winters are frigid. My question:
We have a large cement slab on our property that we’re thinking of building the coop on. Any thoughts on if this would/wouldn’t be a good idea?
Thanks!
 

Ted Brown

Crowing
Dec 12, 2018
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near Shawville Quebec Canada
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My Coop
I have no direct experience but have read that cement makes a very secure foundation for a coop, excellent for keeping digging predators out. Of course care must be take to ensure that the coop itself is also predator proof.

You will also need to add a bedding material to the floor, many choices exist. Searching herein will help determine what will work best with concrete.

Best of luck!
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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I’ve live in Minnesota, so our winters are frigid. My question:
We have a large cement slab on our property that we’re thinking of building the coop on.

In the winter, make sure you have enough bedding on it, to keep the chickens' feet warm. Anything from 2-3 inches up to a foot or more.

When you build the doorway: I suggest you arrange a board or something across the bottom to keep the bedding from falling out, but make it removable for when you want to clean the coop.

If you pile the bedding deep enough (maybe a foot), you might not have to clean it all winter. If any particular spot looks extra-poopy, turn that lump over with a pitchfork, but otherwise the chickens are likely to keep it all scratched up and mixed. (Depends a bit on the size of the coop--I think they mix it better in larger coops, because there's more space for them to work in.)

You can also add more bedding on top of what's there, rather than scooping it all out and starting over. Cleaning a coop in the middle of a cold, snowy winter is something I prefer to never do again (I grew up in Alaska.)
 

MN-chick

Hatching
Jun 5, 2020
4
2
5
In the winter, make sure you have enough bedding on it, to keep the chickens' feet warm. Anything from 2-3 inches up to a foot or more.

When you build the doorway: I suggest you arrange a board or something across the bottom to keep the bedding from falling out, but make it removable for when you want to clean the coop.

If you pile the bedding deep enough (maybe a foot), you might not have to clean it all winter. If any particular spot looks extra-poopy, turn that lump over with a pitchfork, but otherwise the chickens are likely to keep it all scratched up and mixed. (Depends a bit on the size of the coop--I think they mix it better in larger coops, because there's more space for them to work in.)

You can also add more bedding on top of what's there, rather than scooping it all out and starting over. Cleaning a coop in the middle of a cold, snowy winter is something I prefer to never do again (I grew up in Alaska.)

Thanks for the tips!! I wouldn’t have even thought of the doorway situation and how it may be a pain while cleaning! And I agree, I don’t think cleaning the coop sounds like fun when the temp is below zero!
 

MN-chick

Hatching
Jun 5, 2020
4
2
5
I have no direct experience but have read that cement makes a very secure foundation for a coop, excellent for keeping digging predators out. Of course care must be take to ensure that the coop itself is also predator proof.

You will also need to add a bedding material to the floor, many choices exist. Searching herein will help determine what will work best with concrete.

Best of luck!

Thank you for the well wishes! I am excited for this little adventure. I was thinking the cement would help with preventing digging predators from getting in too. Thanks again!
 

Ted Brown

Crowing
Dec 12, 2018
1,296
2,898
261
near Shawville Quebec Canada
My Coop
My Coop
@Krazikatlady64 makes a good point.

You should flood the concrete pad with a hose before you start to get a sense of where the water collects/flows. You do not want water to be running inside the coop and/or into the bedding. Not healthy for your birds.

Caulking will go a long way to deter water ingress but you also want to be cautious about water wicking into any wood that sits directly on the concrete as it will rot. There is a gasket material (cheap!) that you can get at a hardware store, comes in a roll and is about 6" wide; lay this down between the concrete and wood foundation/wall and caulk along the inside/outside edges to impede water .

Sounds like it will be a neat build!
 

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