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Ceramic heat emitters

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by SueT, May 27, 2016.

  1. SueT

    SueT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 27, 2015
    SW MO
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    I have just tried using a ceramic heat emitter bulb (CHE) for brooding chicks, and the difference is literally like night and day. : ) I found old forums on this site discussing them, but nothing recent. Two weeks ago I ended up with 2 baby chicks to raise after a broody hen rejected my idea that she should take them in. I set them up with the usual bright bulb 24/7 but I thought it would be nice for them to experience nighttime. Since my 75 watt light bulb was keeping their cage at the proper temp, I ordered a 75W CHE on Ebay. It was $6 which included shipping. The local pet store charges around $20. It took about 10 days to get here. By this time, I had changed their 75W bulb for a 60W. Anyway, the chicks had 10 days under harsh bright light, after which I introduced the new heat bulb. It was in the daytime, but the reduction of light in their cage so pronounced that they immediately went to sleep! I found that the 75W CHE was not quite as warm as the 60W lightbulb, and have had to lower it to maintain the same temp. I can raise it when they need a cooler temp. Last night was their first real night, in total darkness. In the morning I found them sleeping side by side under the lamp. They seem happy with the natural daylight. It seems strange to have the light fixture and no light, but it's nice and warm under it. The little branch they like to perch on is nice and warm too. So far I am pleased with the CHE.
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  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    I couldn't agree more.
    I now keep them on 24 hour light for the first 3 days so they can eat and drink whenever they're awake and then I put them on hemeral lighting with at least 8 hours of darkness or natural day/night cycle - depending on where they are.
    I have several 150 and 75 watt ceramics.
    I've also recently switched to the premier hover brooders for small batches.
    I'll never use the glass infrareds again.
     
    1 person likes this.

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