Chain link and hardware cloth

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kemclaughlin, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. kemclaughlin

    kemclaughlin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would it work to use chain link fencing to do the sides and top of the run and then use hardware cloth three feet up the sides? That way the fencing is strong and there is cloth to keep raccoons from grabbing chickens through the holes. And for the bottom, we would bury either hardware cloth or chicken wire. Does it matter if it's buried?
     
  2. dbounds10

    dbounds10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a chain link dog kenel run and asked the same questions in another post. The conclusion was that I put the harware cloth 3 feet up the chain link with an "apron" buried about 6 inches deep with left over pave stones on top of that. We have not moved the girls out there yet as we have one panel left to complete but it seems pretty secure.

    I have also see the apron not buried, if you have grass, just scrape the grass down and it will grow back through and secure the wire.
     
  3. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, it matters if it's buried. Burying discourages digging--if it's not buried or otherwise secured at the bottom, something WILL eventually scoot in underneath the fence.

    Hardware cloth, not chicken wire. Chicken wire rusts into nothingness over time, and starts to tear into pieces long before that. Burying wire is a pain in the rear--install the right stuff the first time! [​IMG]
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Would it work to use chain link fencing to do the sides and top of the run and then use hardware cloth three feet up the sides? That way the fencing is strong and there is cloth to keep raccoons from grabbing chickens through the holes.

    IF your chainlink is heavy gauge (a lot of what's sold for cheap these days is too thin, it does not even reliably retain a determined dog) AND is installed very very correctly (tightly-stretched without wibbliness, and very well connected all around the edges, preferably with bolted connectors rather than clips at the ends) then what you describe is a good setup IMHO for the sides of the run.

    I have more misgivings about using chainlink for a run *top*. If it is a high quality premade kennel panel designed to be on the top, then maybe. But if it is DIY it is very very unlikely IMHO that you will get it done well enough that an animal can't simply pry its way thru (if there is any slack, they can just pull two adjacent wires apart and enlarge it into a really quite large hole). Also chainlink is pretty heavy and saggy for a top. I would suggest instead using welded wire of whatever size holes you feel is acceptable, and supporting it well with some crosswise lumber.

    And for the bottom, we would bury either hardware cloth or chicken wire. Does it matter if it's buried?

    It matters whether you have some kind of digproofing, yes; but it is NOT required that you necessarily bury anything.

    Indeed, a horizontal apron of strong welded wire of whatever sort, 2-3+ ft wide, laid just outside the run fencing and securely affixed to the foot of the run fencing, then pegged or weighed down or covered with mulch/gravel/turf/pavers/rubble/whatever, works pretty much as well as burial does, and for a LOT less work [​IMG]

    If you do bury the foot of the run fence instead, you need to go down 18" to have reasonably-good assurance that nothing will go under. That is a lot of digging. Personally I recommend the apron approach for nearly all circumstances [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat​
     
  5. irishchickateer

    irishchickateer New Egg

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    my chicken wire is already tearing up and starting to rust is dat just cause i live in ireland and the weather changes alot [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:No, more likely it is because either your chickenwire was not galvanized or was poor-quality galvanized (it is awfully difficult to find GOOD chickenwire these days). I would suggest replacing it with something, preferably heavier gauge, that has better quality galvanization (yes, it will cost more) and you will be far more satisfied with it [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  7. bonbon31316

    bonbon31316 Out Of The Brooder

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    That's how I have mine ....Chain link with 3 ft of hardware mesh buried 12inches deep and 6inches out with plant and flowers planted over it. The only problem I have had is the chicks fly up and eventually out of the chain link holes so the only thing I would do different is put the hardware mesh way higher.
     
  8. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    I bought some very heavy gauge chain link for my run (from Habitat Restore, a used building supply store, for cheap) and wrapped hardware wire over it. I had some chain link left over so I used it for the apron. My chain link was 6 ft. I undid it every 3 ft. , used a heavy galvanized wire to weave the sections together, attached it to the bottom board of the run with screw and washers every 6 inches, layed it out and staked it down. I foster Saint Bernards, big strong dogs. They can use their weight to push chain link. I've had them break out of dog kennels, but none have yet been able to get into the run.

    I agree with bonbon, I'd just go ahead and cover the entire run with hardware wire too (1/2" x 1/2 "). That way you can put roosts higher up in the run and you also won't have wild birds flying in eating all your feed, leaving mites behind. I plan on doing it to mine.
     
  9. Murs

    Murs Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a similar set up. 10x10 foot chain link area with a gate and inside is the coop. I had leftover chain link so I ran that over the floor and attached it to the side walls of the chain link so nothing can dig in.


    The missing link in what I thought was a very secure coop was the hardware cloth.

    I'm sure it was a raccoon. It didn't get in, it reached through the chain link and pulled my chicken out. My poor chickens!!! It only got one of them and I know it will be back.


    My weekend project is hardware cloth. My question is, "What do you use to secure the hardware cloth to the chain link?"

    The easiest would be zip ties but I have read that the raccoons will chew right through those. Any suggestions?
     
  10. Murs

    Murs Out Of The Brooder

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