Chances of hen going broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by CrystalScott, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. CrystalScott

    CrystalScott New Egg

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    Dec 30, 2016
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    Please advise: I would like my girl to hatch a batch of chicks, and I heard that leaving the eggs with her might instigate her to go broody. But I don't want to waste the eggs... [​IMG] So does anyone have opinions on the chances of this working? She's a light brahma, about 8 months old, and yes, it's cold where I am, but she's laying an egg a day!! Also, yes, I am sure all the eggs I've been collecting are fertilized! [​IMG]
     
  2. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    It's a hormonal thing and nothing can be done to trigger broodiness (some people seem to observe that the presence of other broodies can trigger it however). She'll let you know when she's good and ready to sit.
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] I think that leaving eggs in the nest in Michigan this time of year will only result in frozen eggs. Try putting several ceramic eggs in the nest box, and let nature take it's course.
     
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  4. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If you want chickens hatched on your schedule, you need to get an incubator. Where do you plan on brooding chicks in Michigan in January/February? If you want your hen to hatch them out, I'd wait a couple more months and let nature take its course.
     
  5. CrystalScott

    CrystalScott New Egg

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    If you want chickens hatched on your schedule, you need to get an incubator. Where do you plan on brooding chicks in Michigan in January/February? If you want your hen to hatch them out, I'd wait a couple more months and let nature take its course.[/quote. I would have to bring the chicks inside until they are big enough to return to coop. The only reason I'm rushing it is because I'm about to lose my Roo (due to aggression) but wanted to take advantage of his great fertility first. I understand it was a long shot... just hoping! I think I'll patiently wait until spring and go from there.
     
  6. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    You can Brood eggs anytime of the year....First though your Hen does need to be Broody.......You can not encourage it.....They either Brood or not.....I have two Broodies setting Duck eggs as we speak.....lol


    Try in the Spring....


    Cheers!
     
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If your rooster is aggressive, I wouldn't hatch chicks from him anyway. Find a nice calm one, or if you want pullets only, wait until you have a broody hen, put some fake eggs under her for about 21 days, then get some day-old chicks to put under her one night, swapping out the eggs. Works like a charm for me.
     
  8. duluthralphie

    duluthralphie Chicken Wrangler Premium Member

    Welcome To BYC. They will go broody in due time, this is not a great time for those of us up north as others said.

    Ceramic eggs are better than wasting good omelets if you want to encourage her.

    Good luck whatever you do, ad enjoy your time with us here at BYC.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I like to play around. I’ve tried a few times to entice a broody by putting an extra fake egg a day in a nest until I had a dozen or just over and leaving them for weeks. One time I used marked real eggs. I did get a broody hen once, but that was in a different nest. Was that successful? The rest of the time it was a failure. While I try to never say never when it comes to behaviors, I’m not all that impressed by this method and I have hens in my flock that go broody.

    I agree with Bobbi. If that cockerel or rooster is aggressive toward humans I would not hatch eggs he fertilized. Again it is a behavior, you just can’t be certain on behaviors, but there is a lot of debate on this forum whether human aggression is a learned or inherited trait. My belief is that it is a combination. I believe traits that can lead to human aggression can be inherited but that environment also plays a part.

    I’ve turned my flock into one where most of the hens go broody and they are pretty well behaved by carefully selecting which chickens I want to breed based on behaviors as well as productivity or appearance. There are too many good roosters out there to settle for one that is less than good.

    No matter what breed of hen you have or how many you have there is no guarantee one will ever go broody. If one does it probably won’t be at a convenient time, that happens a lot. If one does and you don’t have fertile eggs, you can do what Bobbi suggested, get day old chicks for her to raise if you can find them. Or get fertile eggs from someone else. You can order eggs off the internet or even this forum in the right section, but I suggest you find your state thread and chat with your neighbors. Someone within driving distance should have fertile eggs you can get.
     

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