Chantecler Thread: Buff, Patridge, White, Red and any rare colors!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by HallFamilyFarm, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    THREAD CHANGE: This thread is now an all Chantecler Thread: Buff, Patridge, White, Red and any of the rare, nonstandard colors!


    From Ideal Poultry Farms, Inc website:

    https://secuservices.com/ideal/newideal/selectproduct.aspx?qty=1&ID=BFCHS&Product=779

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    Buff Chantecler
    St Run

    Chanteclers are the first breed of Canadian creation. They were bred to produce a general-purpose bird with a vigorous and rustic temperament that could resist the cold climatic conditions of Canada. They are a dual-purpose breed with yellow skin that is used to produce both meat and brown-shelled eggs. All of the plumage is buff or straw colored. Their appearance is very strong and stable with clean legs. They have very small cushion combs that are set firm and low on the fore part of the head.

    Buff Chanteclers are available from Mid-Feburary thru the first week of June.

    Standard weights at maturity are males-7 1/2 lbs. and hens-5 1/2 lbs.


    Please post your thoughts, any history and information on the Buff Chantecler.

    The only photos that I can locate is at:

    http://redstagacres.webs.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=4821719

    http://www.chanteclerfanciersinternational.org/
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2010
  2. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    This spring I recieved some Buff Chanteclers with some other chicks. We now have a nice young trio. They are a beautuful even Buff color. Shanks are a bright and deep yellow. Combs are almost non-existance. Will post photos soon.
     
  3. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    Found this photo online. Am hoping my male Buff Chantecler looks ay least half this good when mature. The owner/breeder is http://redstagacres.webs.com

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  4. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    Our Buff Chanteclers with some of our Buckeyes. We only have three young birds. My daughter is holding the youngest bird.

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  5. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    ORIGIN OF MY BUFF CHANTECLER STOCK

    BY WALTER FRANKLIN (1985)

    When I retired, we took up our search for the ideal farm chicken. This bird must be rugged and vigorous enough to live and grow, on range or in confinement, under widely varied conditions of housing and climate. The hens must be year-around layers, satisfactory mothers, and top quality meat birds. This last requirement will eliminate varieties with dark pinfeathers. White birds are attractive while they are white. If conditions are not ideal, they show dirt or soiled easily. They seem more susceptible to cannibalism and feather picking than colored birds. White birds are also prime targets for predators because of their high visibility. Buff appeared to be the answer to our color problem. Buff pinfeathers or feather residue blends best with yellow skin color, so buff birds dress out well. Buff birds are less conspicuous than white, when predators are prowling.

    Buff Rocks,Wyandottes, or Orpingtons can be fine layers and meat birds, but they have a lot of trouble from frozen combs and wattles in severe winter weather. The Chanteclers, seemed to have the closest to frost-proof combs and wattles of any dual-purpose breed. They are also good layers and meat birds. They were not available in buff, however. Those who know poultry history told me that Buff and Black Chanteclers were bred at one time, but never made it into the Standard. We could not find any Chanteclers, but the Standard told what crosses were used to make the first Chantecler varieties. I decided to try a somewhat similar plan, using buff breeds.

    About 1977,we crossed Buff Cornish and Buff Wyandotte large fowl. The next year, we mated a Buff Rock male to our cushion combed Cornish Wyandotte pullets .The following year, the pullets from this latest cross were mated to a couple of their mother’s brothers .By crossing and back-crossing among these three breeds (so that propagation could continue without too much close inbreeding), and selecting for type as depicted. in the Standard, we have obtained Buff Chanteclers.

    Their eggs are medium brown, of good size, and these Buff Chanticleers are excellent meat birds. They lay well and are close to the Standard in type and color. We feel that they are the best all-purpose breed and variety, for the farm or backyard flock, and in the show room.

    We decided a couple of years later, to try and make Chantecler bantams using the same method followed in the development of the Standard Chantecler.This was a little more difficult for the Buff Chantecler bantams than for the White or Partridge varieties. There were no Buff Cornish bantams around to use, so we used White Cornish bantams, along with Buff Wyandotte and Buff Rock, in bantams. Some of our Buff Chantecler bantams still want to sport a bit of white among their buff wing and tail feathers. Careful breeding should soon make this a rarity, we hope. We have been trying to make Buff Cornish bantams out of the Buff Chantecler bantams that come with pea combs. We are still a long way from home on this one; some are getting fair color and passable combs. The heavy bone and body type just aren’t there yet. I tried crossing a White Laced Cornish bantam on these Buffs this year, but the color does not look too promising.

    Editor’s note: I met Walter Franklin and saw his birds at a show in Nov.1985. Walter had Buff, White, and Partridge Chanteclers in both Standards and bantams that he made from scratch in each. They were all well made and I was impressed with the Buff Chantecler large fowl. I feel they deserve to be a Standard of Perfection variety, I understand they are working on getting them admitted. I liked the cushion comb, and think it looks nicer than either a rose comb or a pea comb. My guess on the origin of Buff Chanteclers, was a Buff Cornish - White Chantecler cross. Walter wrote the above article at my request to more fully explain his work. The buff color looks splendid on the Chantecler type and cushion comb. D.J.Honour (1986).
     
  6. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    I would like to add that buff and red chante's are not accepted to the SOP.


    Good luck finding some more buff's (though i do not like them tat much [​IMG])

    yes there are some blues/blacks in QU but non else where (yet!)
     
  7. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    The http://www.chanteclerfanciersinternational.org members are working on acceptance into the SOP for the Buffs. The Reds are new. Seems only Ideal Poultry Farms have the Reds. It is reported that the creator of the patridge variety also had every variety that was current in the Plymouth Rocks.

    You can still show non-Standard varieties in any breed, just can't win anything but AOV...All Other Variety.

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  8. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

    5,683
    59
    291
    Jan 25, 2010
    Monticello, Arkansas
    THREAD CHANGE: This thread is now an all Chantecler Thread: Buff, Patridge, White, Red and any of the rare, nonstandard colors!
     
  9. slc

    slc Songster

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    I have a number of buff and partridge from Ideal. I am a little disappointed with them. All but one of the buff have large ugly pea combs not cushion. Their temperaments are not great either. The roosters are abusive and rowdy. They are the only birds in my flock prone to feather picking and I've even observed them plucking out their own tail feathers. They are big and wide so they'll make nice stew soon. Only one of the buff has a cushion comb, however, I'm not convinced its either male or female.

    The partridge are a little better in type. My rooster has a nice cushion and form. The hen is a bit of a runt. She is a little too small for the size egg she lays and that is a flaw to me.

    I've decided to cull all but the Partridge rooster and the laying hen. Next year I'll look for good breeder stock for the original white or "true" Chantecler. The red from Ideal are the cross of their buff x partridge stock.

    I do love the Chantecler breed here in Northern Wisconsin. They weather the cold better than any of the other breeds I keep. Last winter all my Orpingtons lost their beautiful points. I don't have to worry about that with the Chanteclers.
     
  10. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm APA ETL#195

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    Monticello, Arkansas
    slc, sorry to hear of your buffs. Perhaps they sent you buff cornish instead? Mine all have nice cushion combs. Not sure on type as they are still young. Their buff color is excellent. All of my Buff Chantecler are from Ideal. I hope to add a male from show lines this fall.
     

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