Cheapest way to insulate a tin roof?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by happyhens, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. happyhens

    happyhens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any suggestions for a good cheap way to insulate a tin roof on a very small coop (3'x3'x30")? I am almost done building the frame! So far it has been totally free. I'm even re-using the screws that were already stuck in the scrap wood I am using, I haven't had to buy any more of them yet. I intend to use it to brood chicks in that are too young to be in the main coop, but too old and stinky and active to remain in the house brooder, or use it for broody hens to raise their babies in. I also may use it for a breeding pair or trio of silkies. I want to add a run later, but for now its just the coop part. I may put it on legs later on and put wire around the bottom of it to add another level. Anyway, I am trying to keep my expenses down, so I need some ideas for how to insulate the tin as cheaply as possible. Anyone?
     
  2. phalenbeck

    phalenbeck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cardboard, glued and screwed
     
  3. 1shelby1

    1shelby1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes-cardboard! Look for bike boxes!Good for you to reuse!!
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Cardboard will sog and mold and fall off in a typical climate where you had to insulate the roof in teh first place.

    See if a construction site has a scrap piece of rigid foamboard insulation you can have. As a distinct second-place, ask around stores til you score some sheet styrofoam that was used for packing stuff that they had delivered. (Preferably you want just plain flat 1-2" sheets. They *are* used for packing, you just have to keep looking)

    Cut to size. Then keep it up there by sandwiching it behind a layer of thin plywood or discarded panelling or anything like that, screwed to the inside of the roof nailers or whatever is available to screw it to.

    Actually you *could* just use the layer of plywood (no insulation behind it) if you only need protection vs condensate and aren't in a VERY cold climate. Be more effective, in several ways, to have the foamboard behind it, though.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  5. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If, you're not in a cold area, or, like where I am, when it does get cold, there is no humidity (15 degress @ 20%!) it takes very little to prevent condensation. All of my structures are metal roofed. Most are metal over 1/2" osb. The osb lets me walk around without damaging the seams and provides just enough insulation value to prevent condensation. It all depens on where you are. The metal buildings we built in the PNW needed at least R-5 to keep from sweating.
     
  6. happyhens

    happyhens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in KY, so usually it is warm but we do have some pretty cold nights during the winter (can get below zero or single digits several nights in a row). I just remembered that I do have some sheets of pegboard, could I use that in any way to help insulate the roof? I do intend to use it to make dividers to go between the nestboxes, but I have plenty for the roof too. I could even double it up if needed. Thanks for all the input.
     
  7. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:The pegboard wouldn't be the best solution. the holes would still allow airflow to the bottom of the tin and you'll get condensation. Dead airspace, or insulation (styrofoam, urethane foam, fiberglass batts) are what you will need between the roof and your interior. Pegboard would work to protect the insulation from pecking, if, you use fiberglass will need a vapor barrier (thin plastic of some kind) or your insulation will eventually absorb moisture from the coop and you'll have a bigger problem than no insulation at all. Hope this makes sense. Post again if you still have questions. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2009
  8. JCfans

    JCfans Out Of The Brooder

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    We just put up 1/2" foam board insulation to stop the condensation problem that we had with our tin roof. It worked like a charm and was reasonably inexpensive. I would recommend it.
     
  9. jnjross

    jnjross Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    edwards, ms
    Quote:yes, this one
     
  10. happyhens

    happyhens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok thanks! I'll see what I can come up with, you all have given me some good ideas of what to look for. Hopefully I can work on the coop throughout this week and finish it up next weekend. I'm excited! Thanks for all the advice.
     

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