chick aggression toward me

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mandamay28, May 22, 2016.

  1. mandamay28

    mandamay28 Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    2
    51
    Apr 20, 2016
    I have 12 2week old chicks. I ordered 11 hens 1 Roo.. I think I got a second Roo. This little White Cochin charges and has even pecked my hand when put my hand in the brooder. His wing growth is much slower than the others too. Question is... how do I handle the aggression toward me? So far when he does it I just push back a little with my finger to show him I'm not afraid. I've read other posts that say they have picked them up when aggressive. Just wondering whats best to stop potential problems before they become habits. TIA![​IMG]
     
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

    7,748
    2,285
    416
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    You could try holding him down, specifically, having his head down, and don't let him up until he quiets. If he's this difficult this early, be glad that he's your second cockrel, and not a keeper! It's very early times, so watching the group grow older will be interesting; there's plenty of time for behaviors to develop, and decisions to be made. Meanwhile, don't let him peck at you! Mary
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    At such a young age it may look like they are aggressive ?
    I have 32 mixed chicks that are two weeks old and it appears too me that its food related. The braver chicks peck my rings and get after my hands when I remove or add new bedding.
    None of mine show any signs of Rooster behaviour yet! All still act like inquisitive chicks!

    I would not worry yet?
     
  4. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    10,242
    3,316
    461
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    That wing growth delay certainly does point to the chick being male. And it's possible for a chick, even at this age, to display aggressive temperament. Chicks are very good candidates for behavior training since they are designed to take their cues from the flock adults, and their human caregiver qualities to fill that role.

    Be gentle. No need to be rough, but do show the chick this behavior will not be tolerated. Start off by simply giving it a poke on the back. Usually that's enough at this early age to curtail the behavior. Do it each time the chicks behaves badly. It usually doesn't take more than two days of occasional pokes to stop the behavior.

    However, if this is a cockerel with aggressive behavioral tendencies programmed into it, you will probably need to do more training as this little character develops, especially as it nears the hormonal stage around four months or even as early as ten weeks. This requires restraining until the cockerel relaxes into a submissive posture.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by