chick hatched with one eye that looks to be undeveloped

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by simplyr0wdy, Nov 15, 2013.

  1. simplyr0wdy

    simplyr0wdy New Egg

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    11 of 15 hatched and the last one which was a day or so behind has an eye that looks undeveloped. you can tell theres an eye there but only has a tiny pen tip sized spot that you can see eye. it cant blink has no lids but looks to have a tiny tiny part of the lower lid the rest is all together. i cant even see where the lids are supost to connect. anyone else ever had this happen?
     
  2. brahmabreeder

    brahmabreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sounds interesting to say the least. Could you post a picture for all of us wanting to see this for the first time?[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2013
  3. simplyr0wdy

    simplyr0wdy New Egg

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    [​IMG][/IMG]


    The whole group of newbies
     
  4. simplyr0wdy

    simplyr0wdy New Egg

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    [​IMG]

    Here's the little one eyed. It seems to not be in an pain
     
  5. brahmabreeder

    brahmabreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seems like just a birth defect. I would cull it if your intentions are breeding birds toward the SOP. If you just have them for fun then I believe it will live without too many problems. Other birds may pick on it and don't be surprised if a predator comes and that is the one to go.
     
  6. simplyr0wdy

    simplyr0wdy New Egg

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    I just do it for eggs and to keep the ticks away. It's also fun! On chick actualy helped it out of its shell and pulled it out. Was amazing, it seems to be fitting in fine. Just is very interesting.
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: I'd watch that; cannibalism is bred into some strains, specifically the mass-produced ones. Even day-old chicks can begin cannibalizing each other. They've had their instincts warped until they view other chicks as food. Being pulled out of the shell is not helpful, it can cause the 'umbilical cord' to rip out of the guts and disembowel the chick, or cause it to hemorrhage to death even if not disemboweled. Generally, going from my observations with many hundreds of chicks, a chick that is pulled out of its shell suffers fatal injury because of it in well over half of all the cases.

    I have heard on this site of other chicks born without an eye, and speculate it's due to the sheer prevalence of drugs used in poultry. Some of those chemicals used for worming etc have some serious risks, which generally are not on the label but rather on the manufacturer's site or the industry chemical infosheet. Many of these drugs are believed to be safe by the general public, even touted as safe on the label, but in fact contain extremely toxic chemicals in low doses, as one can find if one digs a little deeper for the info. A low dose can accumulate over generations, and often does; sensitivities to these drugs also tend to develop over generations of exposure, rather like herding dogs and second-hand ivomectin and its family. So I don't think it's necessarily genetic, as it's a classical chemical damage defect that crops up in many other species and has been traced to drugs used on them.

    The chick should be ok, but as others said it may be a target for any bullies among its fellows or predators. Contrary to popular belief not all poultry are inherently bullies or killers of the weak. Many are 'live and let live'. If you breed bullies, you get bullies. If you breed those who do not harm injured or ill poultry, you get non-bullies. Taking intensively farmed commercial poultry home generally means you're bringing home a host of behavioral and physical defects which will not all be resolved in one generation, nor two, nor three...

    I won't breed any bird that harms a chick or an ill or injured bird, or shows any leaning towards cannibalism; consequently these are not issues I have to deal with, ever. I bred them out long ago and even the newcomers that I bring in from time to time seem to observe the status quo and just obey the 'house rules'. Chickens have been shown in studies to have empathy, but others are plain psychotic, which is to be expected when you raise them under intensive, stressful, abnormal conditions where killing and eating the weak or injured is a survival trait rather than an aberrant behavior. Humans are responsible for the majority of harmful behavior in poultry and other species we have domesticated.

    Anyway, best wishes.
     

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