chicken appears sick - problem solved

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by nick bulger, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. nick bulger

    nick bulger Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Portsmouth,va
    nick bulger
    So I've been checking out backyard chickens for a while now and I've gotten a lot of good information from it. I decided to officially join today because I have a chicken that's acting funny and I'm at a loss as to what to do and or what's wrong with it. She's just been hanging out in the corner of the yard for a couple with her head and tail down. Her eyes look good it doesn't seem like she's got any kind of diarrhea doesn't appear to be egg bound. He's eating and drinking but not like everybody else is. Her crop seems fine at least it feels the same as everybody else's does. I brought her inside this morning and she ate 10 mil worms and some bread soaked up with milk. She was very interested in the food. I just don't know what to do because I don't know what's wrong[​IMG]
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    She has the puffed up chicken look that can be common with coccidiosis, egg binding, crop problems, worms, and other things. How old is she, and has she been laying eggs recently? Keep her inside in a basket or crate on an old towel or paper towels to get a look at her droppings. Put on a disposable glove and insert a finger into her vent 1-2 inches to feel for an egg (it should just feel soft if no egg.) Check her crop to see if it contains anything, or is full, empty, soft, or hard. Crop problems can make them weak and prevent food from getting digested. Offer some water with electrolytes to her beak. Give her some bits of chopped egg. Add a small amount of water to a bowl with water to make it runny, and offer it to her. Fluids are more important than food at first. If you have a local vet who will examine a few fresh droppings for worms and coccidiosis, that would be good. See if they can get results that day.
     
  3. nick bulger

    nick bulger Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Portsmouth,va
    She's about 15 months old. When I checked yesterday I didn't feel an egg inside her. Midday yesterday her crop did not feel any different from the other girls. This morning after having here inside overnight I could definitely tell that her crop was empty. When I brought her inside for a little while yesterday I did see an unusual dropping it had some solid normal-looking poop in it but it also quite a bit of clear fluid interlaced with some white looking stuff. As far as egg-laying is concerned I'm not certain about the last couple days but I have 10 hens and I have been getting eggs from everyone pretty regularly. Although someone has been laying eggs with corrugated shells. I have gotten 3 in the last 2 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would just make sure that she is eating and drinking. Seek her out to feed some egg every day. You could think about worming her with SafeGuard Liquid Goat Wormer 1 to 1 1/2 ml or Valbazen 1/2 ml orally and repeat that in 10 days. For more difficult worms the SafeGuard may be used for 3-5 days in a row. Or you can take in a few fresh droppings to your vet for a fecal test to look for coccidiosis or worms. At her age, she could be approaching her first molt which can occur between 16-18 months old. That is a time they get standoffish and low energy. They will look scruffy and start sheading feathers around the coop.
     
  5. nick bulger

    nick bulger Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Portsmouth,va
    Thank you I will certainly try that just to be safe. Unfortunately I don't have a vet because the only pets that I have are my chickens. I've called every vet around and no one will examine a stool sample without me bringing the bird in and that means I'm looking at somewhere between 60 and $100. I guess that's what I get for living in the city. Thank you again. I will certainly provide an update
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    You can buy the wormers locally at some feed stores. What chains do you have nearby? Valbazen is what I use and found at Rural King for about $43. Tractor Supply and most stores have the SafeGuard liquid goat wormer $25 and horse paste $12 which are cheaper. Wazine for only round worms can be used in the water for around $10.
     
  7. nick bulger

    nick bulger Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Portsmouth,va
    Thanks a lot for the advice. I've got Tractor Supply and Southern States nearby. But just two clarify you're saying should worm them just to be on the safe side
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Yes, I would at least worm the sick girl. It can be hard to diagnose without lab tests. You may not see worms in the poop, but they can cause problems. Unfortunately you have to toss eggs for 14 days after last dose. The fecal test can save you from the need, but it is pricey. You could worm the others at a later time. Does your chicken feed have probiotics in it? If not, a tsp of plain yogurt a couple of day's a week can add those for gut health.
     
  9. nick bulger

    nick bulger Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Portsmouth,va
    Not quite sure what I have been using has the probiotics in it or not but I plan on Switching do the southern states brand which does have probiotics. But I have a question about molting I was under the impression that they melted in the winter months when the days got shorter. Everybody I talked to told me I had to put a light on them or they would however I did not and they didn't. I was getting a steady supply all winter
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Molting takes place around the age of 16-18 months old and yearly thereafter. It depends on when they hatch, as to the time of year they molt. Since most people tend to hatch in early spring, their chickens tend to molt in fall. Lights in winter time are only to help in laying eggs. They tend to slow down after the first year if they are not getting 12 hours or more of light in the coop. Many do not supplement light in winter to let their chickens take a natural break during the shorter days. I put a single light bulb on a timer that comes on at 5 am, and goes off at daylight. This allows them to go to roost naturally in the light before 5 pm on the shortest days.
     

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