Chicken attacked by fox - Injust treatment question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Onadair, Nov 8, 2010.

  1. Onadair

    Onadair New Egg

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    Nov 8, 2010
    Downingtown
    This is my first forum post so bear with me...

    We have(had) 7 chickens (mix of barred rock, orpington, leghorn and rhode island red). This Saturday (11/06), a fox got into our yard and snatched 2 of our girls; we know it was a fox cause it was still in the yard when we hear the commotion. A third, our orpington, we thought got snatched but we found her later. She's must have gotten scratched or bit by the fox as she's got a long (2 inch) gash on her back. We cleaned it with an antiseptic but not sure we are doing the right thing as there is conflicting information on the web (in general). This hen (Simon) is our favorite hen as she is named after our dog we lost right before she arrived (they are the same color). She is also the only hen which survived a fox attack at the breeder we got her from so we really want her to survive and be OK.

    1) What type of bird , age and weight.
    Buff orpington, 30 weeks, approx 6 lbs
    2) What is the behavior, exactly.
    No altered behavior. Eating and drinking as normal.
    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?
    Injury occured approx 12:30 PM on Saturday 11/06/2010. Hen was relocated at 6:30 PM.
    4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms?
    No
    5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.
    Approximately 2 inch long, 1/4 inch (approx) deep gash on the back.
    6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.
    Attacked by a fox
    7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.
    Water, layer pellets (normal food), watercress greens and beet greens
    8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.
    Normal
    9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?
    Cleaned wound with peroxide for first cleaning. Further cleanings with neosporin wound cleaner
    10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?
    Either or. Just want her better.
    11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.
    No picture
    12) Describe the housing/bedding in use
    straw bedding

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    Eileen
     
  2. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    [​IMG]

    Just getting ready to leave for work when I saw this. I haven't read thru your whole post, but wanted to give you this link. Click the link and go to post 17 by Threehorses--it's a really great article on wound care and I bet it helps you a lot. Good luck with your chook!!

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=218311&p=2
     
  3. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    Shock is her biggest potential enemy - add some electrolytes (Pedialtye will do in a pinch - must be kept refrigerated). Can spritz some on favorite treat(s), e.g. watermelon. A drop or two of Rescue Remedy in her water for a couple of days may help with stress (it's a Bach flower remedy than any good health food store or really good pharmacy or really good pet supply store will have). Cleanse the wound gently with a mix of 1 part Betadine and 9 parts water, approximately. Apply neosporin (the kind withOUT pain relief ingredient) to the wound regularly to try to beat back infection. This should work but if need be, oral or injectible antibiotics may be added to ensure healing. Keep her warm, dry, in a quiet stress free area and offer the yummiest of treats to lift her spirits and give her teh will to get beyond this, as she likely will with your TLC. Keep us posted and I hope she will be okay!
    JJ
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    Fox is my main predator, too; I feel for you.

    For the wound, really, common sense and attention are the best medicine. Not so different from personal first aid. There must be a thousand ways of handling a cut on your arm, but really, if you keep it clean, clean it if it gets gunky, and pay enough attention that you notice if it is getting worse, it will probably be fine no matter what medicines you use.

    One caution: chickens cannot handle the "caine" drugs that are in a lot of topical meds. This is meds that end in -caine, such as benzocaine, cetacaine, lidocaine, etc. There is a pain killer in Neosporin but it is a different drug group and OK for chickens, not that I'm implying they need a pain reliever. Typically they handle wounds well. Although I must say I use any form of Neosporin liberally on myself because it stops pain, with or without pain reliever; I buy the cheapest form, a generic, without pain reliever; still works fine for me.

    The only other thing peculiar to chickens is they will peck a bloody looking wound, so sometimes you have to separate the wounded one. I try not to do this because once a chicken is separated, it must re-enter the flock at the bottom of the pecking order. A lot of people have good luck with Blu Kote sprayed on the wound; it is basically gentian violet, turns the wound bluish purple, which chickens evidently aren't so likely to peck at. It's also a bit of an antiseptic.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2010
  5. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:I wish this myth would die already. It's not all pain relievers, it's "caine" drugs that are the problem.
     
  6. M@M@2four

    [email protected]@2four Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2008
    USA
    Quote:I wish this myth would die already. It's not all pain relievers, it's "caine" drugs that are the problem.

    Agreed---you can apply Neosporin with no problems!!! This helps with pain, heals the wound faster, and will keep it clean. Lather it on really good!!! Good luck!!!
     
  7. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    I mention avoiding pain relief ingredients in order to keep it simple, as I noticed some readers in various threads in the past got the idea that all pain relief ingredients are okay and they are not. There were, at times, dire results because people made that assumption. This could all be explained thoroughly, but there isn't time in every thread to do that when one must fly out the door to work. Also, sometimes the active ingredients can change in a product and unless I have the time to research the latest 'recipes' to be sure nothing has changed, I find it safer to avoid any potential problem and so I stick to recommending aspirin for pain relief. OP, for pain relief, aspirin can be added to water - 1 baby aspirin (81 mg) per cup of water (rough equivalent to five 325mg aspirins pergallon of water), changed out for a fresh batch at least daily.

    JJ
     
  8. Onadair

    Onadair New Egg

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    Nov 8, 2010
    Downingtown
    UPDATE on Fox injury

    Injury is healing with no apparent issues. We are using Neosporing foaming antiseptic wash which is really simply to use and then using the neosporin ointment although we are stopping that today as there is a nice scab on the injury. We put Simon back in the coop yesterday after a few days apart from the rest of the girls and were they all a happy bunch of chickens; probably cause I gave them all the green treats (dandelion greens, red chard and spinach) we were giving Simon to make sure she had great nutrition to heal. I guess it worked cause Simon even laid her first egg ever yesterday! Maybe she just needed to have a little spoiling (LOL) although I would have still loved her even if she never laid an egg.

    I am so thankful and grateful for all the advice from everyone. For a newbie like me, it is great to get advice/recommendations from people who have real life experience.

    Thank you!

    Eileen and Simon
     
  9. M@M@2four

    [email protected]@2four Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2008
    USA
    Quote:Awesome! Just be careful the hens don't start pecking at his scab--if they see blood, they will tear him open! I always keep blue kote handy--it's blue(be careful, it stains). Anytime I have a chick/chicken being pecked at and blood is exposed, I quickly spray blue kote on it and it covers the red and also helps heal the wound!!! Win, win!!! [​IMG] Good luck!!!
     
  10. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, now that the bird is all stabilized, time to pay attention to the fox. Did you find out where it got in and take appropriate measures to prevent a reoccurance? The fox will return, or in this case, you may have more than one as usually a fox only leaves with one at a time. Eveyone who keeps chickens needs a trap and a gun. Get them now. Get a live trap that is big enough for a fox. You can bait it with a couple eggs as they will take an easy meal first, before trying the fence. Eggs are also not messy and can remain in the trap for almost a month. Your gun should be a .22 and is used to dispatch the trapped predator. DO NOT relocate the predator as it is illegal most everywhere and is only dumping your problem on someone else. It is not uncommon for a predator to sleep off a big meal for 2 or 3 days before returning, so be prepared. Good luck........Pop
     

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